EMAC International

COMMAND INSTITUTE

EMAC International’s NIMS Series is a flagship component of the Command Institute and is structured to provide comprehensive Incident Command Management, Emergency Management and Training services to the National Emergency Management Community. EMAC International’s NIMS Series provides comprehensive training, presentations and strategic consulting for incident


NIMS Series

command management. The NIMS series catalog of courses includes core subject areas that can also be modified and custom designed for agency specific training requirements, conferences or facilitated presentations.

EMAC International’s NIMS Series Training programs meet the standards established by the NIMS Integration Center. The courses are unsurpassed in content, technical quality and instructional delivery excellence, integrating the most current provisions of the new NIMS system, or enhancing the elements of your agency’s existing ICS program. EMAC will work in close collaboration with your agency to develop and coordinate a training program that not only addresses local agency specific needs, but also integrates the expanding functional elements of NIMS and the nationally recognized Phoenix FGC, NFA and NFSIMSC Model Incident Management Systems.

The adoption of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) from Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-5) Management of Domestic Incidents, has found many agencies, organizations, municipalities, corporations & businesses unprepared to address strategic implementation, coordination and training issues affecting the federal directive. The NIMS Series provides exceptional resources for addressing the change management process and facilitating the defined needs in training and skills development.


The NIMS Series is designed for:
Fire Department, Rescue, and EMS Services Agencies
Law Enforcement Agencies
Homeland Security and Terrorism Preparedness Agencies
Special Operations, Technical Response, HazMat, WMD,
and other Specialized Teams
Educational and School Institutions
Hospital, Medical, Research, and Health Care Providers
Emergency Management Departments and Agencies
Governmental Agencies and Offices
Corporate, Business, Commercial, Industrial and Military
Facilities, Complexes, Groups, and Agencies

EMAC International’s NIMS Series Training programs are available for classroom style presentations, conference or large audience settings, main conference program presentations and special strategic planning or facilitated sessions. EMAC International also provides informative executive session type program presentations to elected officials and political bodies to support agency presentations, strategic alignment and implementation models and training presentations for strategic roadmaps for coordinating and integrating NIMS into your local emergency response system.

COMMAND INSTITUTE - Course Catalog
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The NIMS Series Training programs fully align with and are integrated into many of the core modules within EMAC International’s Response and Command Training programs for hands-on simulator training.



NIMS Series

NIMS Series Courses

NS 100
Introduction to Incident Command System, ICS-100
NS 200
Basic Incident Command System, ICS-200
NS 300
Intermediate Incident Command System, ICS-300
NS 400
Advanced Incident Command System, ICS-400
NS 402
Incident Command System Summary for Executives, ICS-402
NS 403
NIMS Multi-Agency Coordination System - Concepts and Principles
NS 404
NIMS Public Information System - Concepts and Principles
NS 405
NIMS Preparedness - Concepts and Principles
NS 406
NIMS Resource Management - Concepts and Principles
NS 407
NIMS Communications and Information Management - Concepts and Principles
NS 408
NIMS Supporting Technologies - Concepts and Principles
NS 700
National Incident Management System (NIMS), An Introduction, IS-700
NS 800
National Response Plan (NRP), An Introduction, IS-800
NS 101
National Incident Management System (NIMS) - What Do I Do?
NS 102
Developing an Incident Command System (NIMS ICS)
NS 104
Integrating the National Incident Management System into Local ICS
NS 105
Law Enforcement Incident Command System (LEICS)
NS 106
Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS)
NS 107
NIMS and ICS - Where Do We Go From Here?
NS 108
Integrating National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Management (ICS) into Corporate and Facilities Emergency Response Plans
NS 109
National Incident Management System and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Facility Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens
NS 110
National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
NS 111
NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Emergency Operations Center
NS 112
NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Public Works
 

NIMS Series

NS 100 - Introduction to Incident Command System, ICS-100
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
Entry level first responders (including firefighters, police officers, emergency medical services providers, public works on-scene personnel, public health on-scene personnel and other emergency responders) and other emergency personnel that require an introduction to the basic components of the Incident Command System.

Course Objective: Orient the student to the Incident Command System (ICS).

Course Topical Areas and Secific Objectives:
Purpose of ICS
Identify requirements to use ICS.
Identify three purposes of ICS.
Identify common incident tasks.

Basic Features of ICS
Describe the basic features of ICS.

Incident Commander and Command Staff Functions
Describe the role and function of the Incident Commander.
Describe the role and function of the Command Staff.

General Staff Functions
Describe the role and function of the Operations Section.
Describe the role and function of the Planning Section.
Describe the role and function of the Logistics Section.
Describe the role and function of the Finance/Administration Section.

Facilities
Describe the six basic ICS facilities.
Identify facilities that may be located together.
Identify facility map symbols.

Common Responsibilities
Describe common mobilization responsibilities.
Describe common responsibilities at an incident.
List individual accountability responsibilities.
Describe common demobilization responsibilities.

 

NS 200 - Basic Incident Command System, ICS-200
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
First line supervisors, single resource leaders, lead dispatchers, field supervisors, company officers and entry level positions (trainees) on Incident Management Teams and other emergency personnel that require a higher level of Incident Command System training.

Course Objectives:
Describe an Incident Command System (ICS) organization appropriate to the complexity of an incident or
event.
Use the ICS to manage an incident or event.

Course Topical Areas and Specific Objectives:
Leadership and Management
Describe chain of command and formal communication relationships.
Identify common leadership responsibilities.
Describe span of control and modular development.
Describe the use of position titles.

Delegation of Authority and Management by Objectives
Describe scope of authority.
Describe delegation of authority process.
Describe and explain management by objectives.

Functional Areas and Positions
Identify the ICS tools to manage an incident.
Demonstrate the function of organizational positions within ICS.
Demonstrate the use of an ICS 201 form.

Briefings
Give an Operational Briefing.
Describe components of field, staff and section briefings/meetings.

Organizational Flexibility
Explain how the modular organization expands and contracts.
Given a scenario, complete a complexity analysis.
Define the five types of incidents.
Describe the importance of preparedness plans and agreements.

Transfer of Command
List the essential elements of information involved in transfer of command.
Describe the process of a transfer of command.

 

NS 300 - Intermediate Incident Command System, ICS-300
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
Middle management, strike team leaders, task force leaders, unit leaders, division/group supervisors, branch directors and Multi-Agency Coordination System/Emergency Operations Center staff.

Course Objectives:
Describe how the NIMS Command and Management component supports the management of expanding
incidents.
Describe the incident/event management process for expanding incidents and supervisors as prescribed
by the Incident Command System.
Implement the incident management process on a simulated Type 3 incident.
Develop an Incident Action Plan for a simulated incident.

Course Topical Areas and Specific Objectives:
ICS Fundamentals Review
Describe how ICS fits into the Command and Management Component of NIMS.
Match responsibility statements to each ICS organizational element.
Describe how incidents can best be managed by appropriate and early designation of primary staff
members and delegating authority to the lowest practical level.
List the minimum staffing requirements within each organizational element for at least two incidents of
different sizes.
List the ICS positions which may include deputies and describe deputy roles and responsibilities. Describe
differences between deputies and assistants.
Describe ICS reporting and working relationships for Technical Specialists and Agency Representatives.
Describe reporting relationships and information flow within the organization.

Unified Command
Define and identify the primary features of Unified Command.
Describe how Unified Command functions on a multi-jurisdiction or multi-agency incident.
List the advantages of Unified Command.
Given a simulated situation, demonstrate roles and reporting relationships under a Unified Command which
involves agencies from within the same jurisdiction and under multi-jurisdiction conditions.

Incident/Event Assessment and Agency Guidance in establishing Incident Objectives
Describe methods and tools used to assess incident/event complexity.
Describe types of agency(s) policies and guidelines that influence management of incident or event
activities.
Describe the five steps in transferring and assuming incident command.
Describe the process for developing incident objectives, strategies and tactics.
As part of an exercise, develop Incident Objectives for a simulated incident.

Incident Resources Management
Identify and describe four basic principles of resource management.
Identify the basic steps involved in managing incident resources.
Recognize agency specific aviation policies and procedures as they relate to safety.
Describe the importance of establishing proper span of control for aviation resources and facilities.
Describe how the ICS 215 Operational Planning Worksheet is used to manage incident/event resources.
Describe how the ICS 215A Incident Safety Analysis is used with the ICS 215 to mitigate hazards to
tactical operations.
Identify the organizational elements at the incident that can order resources.
Describe the differences between single and multipoint resource ordering and the reasons for each.
Identify 5 key considerations associated with resource management and the reasons for each.

Planning Process
Identify the importance of planning for incidents/events.
Explain the differences between planning for incidents or events.
Discuss major planning steps including logistical concerns, cost benefit analysis, understanding the
situation, developing and implementing the plan and evaluating the plan.
Explain the criteria for determining when the IAP should be prepared in writing.
Describe the role and use of ICS forms and supporting materials included in an IAP for effective
incident/events management.
Describe the strategy meeting, tactics meeting, planning meeting, operational briefing and team
meetings.
Given a scenario, describe appropriate strategies and tactics to meet Incident Objectives.
Using the strategies and tactics from the scenario, conduct a tactics meeting and complete an ICS 215
Operational Planning Worksheet and ICS 215A Incident Safety Analysis.
Participate in a planning meeting using the planning process, and develop a written IAP for an
incident/event using the appropriate ICS forms and supporting materials.
Using the IAP, conduct an operational period briefing.

Demobilization, Transfer of Command and Close Out
Describe the importance of demobilization planning.
Identify the impact of agency specific policies, procedures and agreements upon demobilization planning.
Identify the ICS titles of personnel who have responsibilities in developing and implementing the
demobilization plan and list their duties.
List the major sections in a demobilization plan.
Identify the need for transfer of command or close out.
Identify the processes involved in a close out meeting.

 

NS 400 - Advanced Incident Command System, ICS-400
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
Command and general staff, agency administrators, department heads, emergency managers, areas commander and Multi-Agency Coordination System/Emergency Operations Center managers.

Course Objectives, Topical Areas and Specific Objectives:
ICS Fundamentals Review for Command and General Staff
Describe how Unified Command functions on a multi-jurisdiction or multi-agency incident.
Define the advantages of Unified Command and list the kinds of situations which may call for a Unified
Command organization.
List the major steps involved in the planning process.
Describe issues that influence incident complexity and the tools available to analyze complexity.
Describe types of agencies, policies, guidelines and agreements that influence management of incident or
event activities.
Describe the primary guidelines and responsibilities of the Command and General Staff positions.
Describe the purposes and responsibilities of agency representatives or technical specialists, reporting
relationships and how they can be effectively used within the incident organization.
Describe the process for transfer of command.

Major and/or Complex Incident/Event Management
List the principal factors found in or related to major and/or complex incidents/events.
List the four expansion options for incident/event organization and describe the conditions under which
they would be applied.
Demonstrate, through an exercise, how to apply the various options related to major and/or complex
incident/event management.

Area Command
Define Area Command.
List the principal advantages of using Area Command.
Describe how, when and where Area Command would be established.
Describe the Area Command organization.
Identify six primary functional responsibilities of Area Command.
Given a scenario, develop an Area Command organization.

Multi-Agency Coordination
Describe the kinds of incident/event management problems that can occur due to a lack of Multi-Agency
Coordination.
Define essential terms related to Multi-Agency Coordination.
Identify the major guidelines for establishing and using Multi-Agency Coordination Groups and Systems.
Provide examples of the different levels at which Multi-Agency Coordination is commonly accomplished.
Identify the primary components of a Multi-Agency Coordination System.
Describe examples of entities that may provide Multi-Agency Coordination.
List the responsibilities of Multi-Agency Coordination entities.
Identify principal positions within a Multi-Agency Coordination System.
Identify differences between Area Command, Unified Command and Multi-Agency Coordination entities.

 

NS 402 - Incident Command System Summary for Executives, ICS-402
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
Elected officials, senior executive, senior managers and agency administrators with policy responsibilities, but without specific ICS or Multi-Agency Coordination System function/roles or responsibilities.

Course Objectives and Specific Objectives:
Define the role of an Executive relative to the ICS.
Describe the various ways ICS can be applied.
Describe the basic organization of ICS and know the functional responsibilities of the Command and
General Staffs.
Describe basic ICS terminology.
Identify the differences between incident/event ICS organizations and the activities accomplished by
area Commands, EOCs and MACS.
Describe the major responsibilities of an Executive as related to an incident/event, including the agency
administrator briefing and delegation of authority.
Explain the administrative, logistical, financial and reporting implications of large incident/event
operations.

 

NS 403 - NIMS Multi-Agency Coordination System - Concepts and Principles
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
This course includes the core concepts and principles of the National Incident Mangement System (NIMS) Multi-Agency Coordination System as taught by DHS and as defined in the NIMS document. The course incorporates the following components:

A Multi-Agency Coordination System is a combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures and communications integrated into a common system with responsibility for coordinating and supporting domestic incident management activities.

The primary functions of multi-agency coordination systems are to support incident management policies and priorities, facilitate logistics support and resource tracking, inform resource allocation decisions using incident management priorities, coordinate incident management related information and coordinate interagency and intergovernmental issues regarding incident management policies, priorities and strategies.

A typical MACS may contain one or several EOCs. A typical Multi-Agency Coordination System may contact numerous Department Operations Center (DOCs). Depending upon the type and location of the emergency/disaster various command elements, i.e., area commands, unified command or the incident commander, will have to coordinate activities within an established MACS.

The course will describe to participants the components of a multi-agency coordination system and establish relationships between all elements of the NIMS. The course will also increase the participant's knowledge of NIMS relevant to the multi-agency coordination system. It will increase the participant's knowledge of the integrated nature of emergency management throughout the nation and advocate the adoption of the guidelines established in the NIMS document. The training will contain specific disaster/emergency related examples that relate to multi-agency coordination systems at the local, state and federal levels of government.

At the conclusion of the training, students should be able to:
Define multi-agency coordination at the local, state and federal levels of government.
Identify each agency involved in incident management activities to ensure appropriate situational
awareness and resources status information is shared through multi-agency coordination.
Identify typical priorities established between elements of the multi-agency coordination system.
Define key terms related to Multi-Agency Coordination System.
Describe the process of acquiring and allocating resources required by incident management personnel in
relationship to the entire Multi-Agency Coordination System.
Identify typical future resource requirements for the entire Multi-Agency Coordination System Identify
potential coordination and policy issues arising from an incident relative to the entire Multi-Agency
Coordination System.

 

NS 404 - NIMS Public Information System - Concepts and Principles
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
This course includes the core concepts and principles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Public Information System as taught by DHS and as defined in the NIMS document. The course incorporates the following components:

Systems and protocols for communicating timely and accurate information to the public are critical during crisis or emergency situations. NIMS' provides some basic guidance that describes the principles, system components and procedures needed to support effective emergency public information. NIMS public information principles include the following factors:

The Public Information Officer (PIO) supports Incident Command.

The PIO supports incident command on all public information matters relating to the management of the incident.

The PIO coordinates public information at or near the incident site and serves as a link to the Joint Information System (JIS).

In a large-scale operation, the on-scene PIO serves as a field PIO with links to the Joint Information Center (JIC), which is typically collocated with the federal, state, local or tribal EOC tasked with primary incident coordination responsibilities.

Public information functions must be coordinated and integrated across jurisdictions and across functional agencies; among federal, state, local and tribal partners; and with private-sector and nongovernmental organizations.

Organizations participating in incident management retain their independence during an incident. Incident commanders and multi-agency coordination entities are responsible for establishing and overseeing JICs
including processes for coordinating and clearing public communications. In the case of unified command, the departments, agencies, organizations, or jurisdictions that contribute to joint public information management do not lose their individual or identities or responsibilities for their own programs or policies. Rather, each entity contributes to the overall unified message.

This course will describe to participants the components of a public information system and establish relationships between all elements of the system and with the multi-agency coordination system under
NIMS. It will also increase the participant's knowledge of NIMS relevant to the public information system. It will increase the participant's knowledge of the integrated nature of emergency management throughout the nation and advocate the adoption of the guidelines established in the NIMS document. The
training will contain specific disaster/emergency related examples that relate to public information systems at the local, state and federal levels of government. The course will describe and increase the participant's knowledge of the Joint Information System and the Joint Information Center.

At the conclusion of the training, students should be able to:
Define public information systems at the local, state and federal levels of government to include the Joint
Information System and Joint Information Center.
Identify each agency involved in public information activities to ensure appropriate situational awareness
and resources status information is shared through joint information system.
Identify typical priorities established between elements of the public information system
Define key terms related to public information system to include the relationship with multi-agency
coordination systems and the field.
Describe the process of gathering, verifying, coordination and disseminating public information by incident
management personnel in relationship to the entire Multi-Agency Coordination System and the public
information system.
Identify typical resource requirements for the public information system.
Identify potential coordination and policy issues arising from an incident relative to the Public Information
System.

 

NS 405 - NIMS Preparedness - Concepts and Principles
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
This course includes the core concepts and principles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Preparedness as taught by DHS and as defined in the NIMS document. The course incorporates the following components:

Levels of Capability. Preparedness involves actions to establish and sustain prescribed levels of
capability necessary to execute a full range of incident management operations.

A Unified Approach. Preparedness requires a unified approach.

NIMS Publications. NIMS provides or establishes processes for providing guidelines; protocols; standards for planning, training, qualifications and certification; and publication management.

Mitigation. Mitigation activities are important elements of preparedness and provide a critical foundation across the incident management spectrum from prevention through response and recovery.

Achieving Preparedness. Individual federal, state, local and tribal organizations are responsible for implementing the preparedness cycle in advance of an incident and appropriately including private sector and non-governmental organizations in such implementation. NIMS provides the tools to ensure and enhance preparedness through the following areas:

Preparedness Organizations
Preparedness Programs
Preparedness Planning
Emergency Operations Plans
Emergency Procedures
Preparedness Plans
Corrective Action and Mitigation Plans
Training and Exercises
Personnel Qualification and Certification
Equipment Certification
Mutual Aid Agreements
Publication Management

 

NS 406 - NIMS Resource Management - Concepts and Principles
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
This course includes core concepts and principles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Resource Management as taught by DHS and as defined in the NIMS document incorporate the components below. Resource management involves coordination and overseeing the application of tools, processes and systems that provide incident managers with timely and appropriate resources during an incident. Resources include personnel, teams, facilities, equipment and supplies. Resource management involves the following four primary tasks:
The establishment of systems for describing, inventorying, requesting and tracking resources;
The activation of these systems prior to and during an incident;
The dispatching of resources prior to and during an incident; and
The deactivating or recalling of resources during or after an incident.


The underlying course concepts that will be included:
Resource management provides a uniform method of identifying, acquiring, allocating and tracking resources.

Resource management uses effective mutual-aid and donor assistance and is enable by the standardized classification of kinds and types of resources required to support the incident management organization.

Resource management uses a credentialing system tied to uniform training and certification standards to ensure the requested personnel resources are successfully integrated into on-going incident operations.

Resource management coordination is the responsibility of the EOCs and/or multi-agency coordination entities, as well as specific elements of the ICS structure (e.g., the Resources Unit).

Resource management should encompass resources contributed by the private-sector and non-governmental organizations.

This course will describe to participants the components of resource management and establish relationships between all elements of resource management with the Multi-Agency Coordination System under NIMS. These elements shall include:

Advance Planning
Resource Identification and Ordering
Categorizing Resources
Use of Agreements
Effective Management of Resources
Management Information Systems
Ordering, Mobilization, Dispatching and Demobilization Protocols
Identifying and Typing Resources
Certifying and Credentialing Personnel
Inventorying Resources
Identifying Resource Requirements
Ordering and Acquiring Resources
Mobilizing Resources
Tracking and Reporting Resources
Recovering Resources
Reimbursement

 

NS 407 - NIMS Communications and Information Management - Concepts and Principles
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
This course includes the core concepts and principles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) communication and information management as taught by DHS (and as defined in the NIMS Document) incorporated with the following components. Effective communications, information management and information and intelligence sharing are critical aspects of domestic incident management. Establishing and maintaining a common operating picture and ensuring accessibility and interoperability are principle goals of communications and information management. A common operating picture and systems interoperability provide the framework necessary to accomplish the following:
Formulate and disseminate indications and warning;
Formulate, execute and communicate operational decisions at an incident site, as well as between
incident management entities across jurisdictions and functional agencies;
Prepare for potential requirements and requests supporting incident management activities; and
Develop and maintain overall awareness and understanding of an incident within and across jurisdictions.

NIMS communications and information management principles include the following factors:

A common operating picture accessible across jurisdictions and functional agencies allows incident managers at all levels to make effective, consistent and timely decisions.

Integrated systems for communication, information management and intelligence and information sharing allow data to be continuously updated during an incident, providing a common framework that covers the incident's life cycle across jurisdictions and disciplines.

A common operating picture helps ensure consistency at all levels of incident management across jurisdictions, as well as between various governmental jurisdictions and private sector and on governmental entities that are engaged.

Common communications and data standards and related testing and compliance mechanisms are fundamental to an effective NIMS.

This course will establish relationships between all elements of the system and with the multi-agency coordination system and incident management under NIMS. It will also increase the participant's knowledge of NIMS relevant to communications and information management. It will increase the participant's knowledge of incident management communications and for the need to implement an effective information management system. The training will contain specific disaster/emergency related examples that relate to communications and information management systems at the local, state and federal levels of government. The training will describe and increase the participant's knowledge of pre-incident information needs, information management needs to include incident notification and situation and status reporting, networking information and technology use to include geospatial information and wireless communication.

At the conclusion of the training, students should be able to:
Define communications and information management at the local, state and federal levels of government
to include the common operating picture, common communications and data standards;
Identify each agency involved in communications and information management activities before, during
and after a domestic disaster incident;
Identify typical interoperability standards established by the NIMS Integration Center relative to
communications and information management to include incident notification and situation reports,
status reports, analytical data, geospatial information, wireless communications and identification and
authentication issues;
Define key terms related to communications and information management to include the relationship with
multi-agency coordination systems, public information systems and the field.
Identify incident management communications issues relative to the incident command system for
individual jurisdictions and for multi-jurisdictions; and
Identify potential coordination and policy issues arising from an incident relative to communications and
information management.

 

NS 408 - NIMS Supporting Technologies - Concepts and Principles
THIS COURSE MEETS THE STANDARDS ESTABLISHED BY THE NIMS INTEGRATION CENTER FOR COURSES AS TAUGHT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS).
This course includes the core concepts and principles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Supporting Technologies as taught by DHS and as defined in the NIMS document. The course incorporates the following components:

Technology and Technological systems provide supporting capabilities essential to implementing and continuously refining the NIMS. These include voice and data communications systems, information systems and display systems. These also include specialized technologies that facilitate incident operations and incident management activities in situations that call for unique technology-based capabilities.

The course will incorporate five key principles:

Interoperability and Compatibility;

Technology Support;

Technology Standards;

Broad-based Requirements; and

Strategic Planning for Research and Development.


Supporting technologies enhance incident management capabilities or lower costs through three principal
activities: operational scientific support; technology standards support; and research and development
support. Training will therefore include the following concepts for supporting technologies:

Operational Scientific Support;

Technical Standards Support to include:

Performance Measurements as a Basis for Standards;
Consensus-Based Performance Standards;
Test and Evaluation by Objective Experts; and
Technical Guidelines for Training Emergency Responders on Equipment Use.

Research and Development to Solve Operational Problems.

 

NS 700 - National Incident Management System (NIMS), An Introduction, IS-700
On February 28, 2003, President Bush issued Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5. HSPD-5 directed the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and administer a National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents.

This course introduces NIMS and explains the purpose, principles, key components and benefits of NIMS to include:
Key concepts and principles underlying NIMS.
Benefits of using ICS as the national incident management model.
When it is appropriate to institute an Area Command.
When it is appropriate to institute a Multiagency Coordination System.
The benefits of using a Joint Information System (JIS) for public information.
Ways in which NIMS affects preparedness.
How NIMS affects how resources are managed.
The advantages of common communication and information management systems.
How NIMS influences technology and technology systems.
The purpose of the NIMS Integration Center (NIC).

 

NS 800 - National Response Plan (NRP), An Introduction, IS-800
This course introduces the student to the NRP, including the concept of operations upon which the plan is built, roles and responsibilities of the key players, and the organizational structures used to manage these resources. The NRP provides a framework to ensure that we can all work together when our Nation is threatened.

Purpose of the course is to introduce the NRP, so that students can:
Describe the purpose of the NRP.
Locate information within the NRP.
Describe the roles and responsibilities of entities as specified in the NRP.
Identify the organizational structure used for NRP coordination.
Describe the field-level organizations and teams activated under the NRP.
Identify the incident management activities addressed by the NRP.

 

NS 101 - National Incident Management System (NIMS) - What Do I Do?
This course will review jurisdictional adoption methodologies and procedures to assist the individual or agency with adopting the NIMS in order to comply with Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)–5, Management of Domestic Incidents. This course is designed to assist the student or agency with jurisdictional compliance and certain aspects of the NIMS, short term and long term.

Specific areas reviewed will include:
Incorporating NIMS into existing training programs and exercises.
Incorporating NIMS into Emergency Operations Plans.
Promoting intrastate mutual aid agreements.
Institutionalize the use of the Incident Command System.
Establishing a timeframe and developing a strategy for full NIMS implementation.

 

NS 102 - Developing an Incident Command System (NIMS ICS)
To coordinate the effective use of all of the available resources, agencies need a formalized management structure that lends consistency, fosters efficiency, and provides direction during a response. The ICS organization is built around five major components: Command, Planning, Operations, Logistics and Finance/Administration.

This course will examine the methodology to incorporate a standardized on-scene incident management system specifically to allow responders to adopt an integrated organizational structure equal to the complexity and demands of any single incident or multiple incidents enabling integrated communication and planning by establishing a manageable span of control.

Nine critical components with be review and exercised:
Common Terminology
Modular Organization
Integrated Communication Plan
Unified Command Structure
Consolidate Action Plan
Span of Control
Designated Incident Facilities
Personnel Resources
Resource Management

 

NS 104 - Integrating the National Incident Management System into Local ICS
The recent adoption of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) has left many agencies, organizations, and municipalities unprepared to address strategic implementation, coordination, and training issues mandated by the federal directive. This program provides participants with a comprehensive overview of the National Response Plan (NRP), National Incident Management System (NIMS), Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-5) - Management of Domestic Incidents, and correlates these to the various incident command systems models presently in use throughout the country.

The program further expands insights into suggested development and implementation models and presents strategic roadmaps for coordinating and integrating NIMS into your local emergency response system. This program can be structured and modified to address specific local and regional emergency management and operational deployment systems, and present insights and options to assist local officials in determination of appropriate implementation models.

This program can also be formatted for use in a Strategic Planning setting, for facilitating dialogue and determining action planning for current or projected NIMS implementation.

 

NS 105 - Law Enforcement Incident Command System (LEICS)
Law Enforcement Incident Command System (LEICS) simplifies the management of critical incidents by organizing the response into modules. Vehicle collisions, pursuits, officer-involved shootings, natural disasters, and civil disturbances represent only a few of the incidents for which an agency can employ LEICS. Under those circumstances involving multiple jurisdictions, LEICS allows agencies to provide a singular response. As a planning tool, LEICS designates in advance the specific duties of all participants. Perhaps more important, it determines who will be in charge at the scene. Whether they require the response of one agency or many, critical incidents become more manageable with LEICS. Anyone in the law enforcement community from the chief, sheriff or to the patrol officer can implement LEICS into its full configuration.

The individual who initiates the ICS response usually assumes command on the scene at the field command post and becomes the incident commander. Unless formally relieved, the incident commander remains in charge and provides a single point of contact. The incident commander oversees the entire operation through divisions, groups or branches, which provide a manageable span of control. All components can be collapsed, expanded, or added as needed during a specific incident. Others may not be needed at all for an emergency limited in scope or duration.

This course is designed to identify elements of the Incident Command System (ICS), as well as the responsibilities of the Incident Commander. Objectives are to define the Incident Command System (ICS); to learn how to identify and take appropriate actions during the stabilization phase of an incident; to learn how to establish a command post and staging area; to describe and apply Division and Group command structure elements; and to describe the purpose and responsibilities of Operations, Planning, Logistics, and Finance/Administration functions within the ICS. All through a series of lectures and table top law enforcement scenarios use to reinforce skills and proficiency.

 

NS 106 - Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS)
Introduction to ICS, setting up command, and establishing primary functional groups within the command structure. Learning how to use hospital-based ICS worksheet to tracking hospital personnel and resources and coordinated resource response to and from the community. Interactive participation.

 

NS 107 - NIMS and ICS - Where Do We Go From Here?
Emergency management, fire, rescue, EMS, and law enforcement response agencies and support organizations may be finding themselves challenged in disseminating information related to the national directive of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and how it translates to their local incident command system. This program provides a clear understanding of NIMS and the elements and components that comprise and translate into the various ICS models. This seminar presents NIMS in the context of a comparison between the NFA ICS Model, the Phoenix Fireground Incident Command Model and the Firescope ICM model and how NIMS can assimilate into most ICM/S systems. The program highlights key factors and options for modifying, enhancing or retooling existing incident management systems.

 

NS 108 - Integrating National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Management (ICS) into Corporate and Facilities Emergency Response Plans
The National Incident Management System (NIMS) establishes parameters for uniformity in the manner in which site specific emergency response operations are conducted and coordinated with the basis on uniformity in organization, terminology and incident management. This program provides insights and guidance on the methodologies to integrate or establish new emergency response plans that are compliant the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the elements of the Incident Command Management systems (ICS). This program identifies the methods, systems and organizational parameters that establish effective and NIMS compliant response plans and utilizes the elements of the Incident Command Management systems (ICS) for site-specific internal operations or when they expand to require off-site municipal resources and agency responses.

 

NS 109 - National Incident Management System and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Facility Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens
This program provides a comprehensive overview of the National Incident Management System and the manner in which it interfaces with the Incident Command System for incident management. The program focuses on the development and integration of NIMS and ICS into a facility’s emergency response and contingency operations plans and the manner in which designated fire marshals, fire wardens and area safety supervisory staff function in assigned roles and interface with external emergency response agencies and organizations.

 

NS 110 - National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
This program provides a comprehensive overview of the National Incident Management System and the manner in which it interfaces with the Incident Command System for incident management. The program focuses on the development and integration of NIMS and ICS into a Corporate, Business or Industrial facility’s emergency management, response and contingency operations plans and the manner in which designated fire brigade, security or emergency response and emergency plan staff function in assigned roles and interface with external emergency response agencies and organizations. This program provides the necessary insights, organizational models and methods to upgrade or develop effective facility plans and incident management systems.

 

NS 111 - NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Emergency Operations Center
This course provides an opportunity for participants to begin developing a NIMS ICS/EOC interface for their community. The course outlines NIMS ICS with Emergency Operations Center (EOC) responsibilities and functions.

 

NS 112 - NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Public Works
This course introduces public works personnel to the NIMS ICS. Several scenarios are included that allow participants to apply NIMS ICS to public works events.

 

 

REACT - RESPONSE and COMMAND TRAINING
learn more about REACT™

NIMS Series
REACT™ Response and Command Training - NIMS Training Series Alignment
Aligned with our NIMS Training Series, the REACT™ training simulator modules address a wide latitude of emergency management, strategic, tactical, administrative, managerial or support functions deliveries and can be designed for delivery to audience groups of 10 – 200 participants.

Discussion-Based and Operations-Based Exercises
Structured under the emerging National Incident Management Systems (NIMS), the comprehensive collection of REACT™ training simulator modules and course content are modified and defined to meet the specific training needs of our client and their response and command requirements. REACT training simulator modules provide an opportunity for participants to learn or refresh on existing ICS/ NIMMS or develop capabilities under the new NIMS command management protocols, integrate site-specific, local or regional emergency response protocols, procedures and deployment standards. EMAC International closes the gap between your command & emergency management needs and the operational proficiencies expected in today’s demanding emergency management profession. The Response and Command Training simulator modules provide your agency or organization with the ability to transition exiting ICS management protocols and procedures into the new NIMS systems with a highly effective training method that integrates dynamic individual and group participative demands, references and builds on the transition from your current ICS protocols to NIMS and provides proficiency skill development to prepare the student to implement these at actual incident events, effectively.

The highly structured yet interactive REACT™ training simulator modules, stimulate and engage participants through sequential exercise simulations and focus on a wide selection of skills development methodologies for incident management and organization protocols, expanding the initial response for effective span of control, implementation or integration of elements of the National Incident Management Systems-NIMS, address Recognition-Primed Decision-Making, Incident Action Planning-IAP, Risk Management & Resource Deployment & Strategic Incident Management, including Single, Unified and Area Command Operations. Other simulation modules can be developed to concentrate on multiple agency coordination, site specific, regional or large scale emergency management incident deployments or postulated initiating incident events.

EMAC International brings our REACT™ modules directly to you location and can accommodate single client deliveries, local, regional or multiple agency or department program facilitations. Our programs are designed for basic, intermediate or advanced level content, are flexible and cost effective based upon our client’s specifications and integrate traditional strategic, tactical and management skills development with cutting edge hands-on training in a controlled environment setting, with the primary objective- to increase participant skills and capabilities for the future incident event. learn more about REACT™

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

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