EMAC International
COMMAND INSTITUTE Course Catalog
This catalog is an informational guide to more than 150 site-delivered courses offered by the Command Institute at EMAC International. The Command Institute’s courses and training programs meet or exceed nationally recognized industry standards. The Institute customizes each course to satisfy the needs and class size of our clients. If you have a specific need which is not covered by our extensive offering, our faculty and curriculum specialists will design a course to fit your requirements.

 

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.

 

NIMS Series
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NIMS Series Courses

NS 100
Integrating the National Incident Management System into Local ICS
NS 101
National Incident Management System (NIMS) - What Do I Do?
NS 102
Developing an Incident Command System (NIMS ICS)
NS 103
The National Response Plan (NRP) and
the National Incident Management System (NIMS)
NS 104
National Incident Management System (NIMS), IS-700
NS 105
Introduction to Incident Command System, IS-100
NS 106
Basic Incident Command System, IS-200
NS 107
Intermediate Incident Command System, IS-300
NS 108
Law Enforcement Incident Command System (LEICS)
NS 109
Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS)
NS 110
NIMS and ICS - Where Do We Go From Here?
NS 111
Integrating National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Management (ICS) into Corporate and Facilities Emergency Response Plans
NS 112
National Incident Management System and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Facility Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens
NS 113
National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
NS 114
NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Emergency Operations Center
NS 115
NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Public Works
NS 116
NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) for Public Officials
 

Sturctural Anatomy Series
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Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction Series Courses

SA 100
Structural Anatomy™ for the Command and Company Officer:
Surviving Combat Fire Engagement
SA 101
Structural Anatomy™:
Wood Frame and Ordinary Construction - Fire Operations
SA 102
Structural Anatomy™ of Light Weight Roof and Floor Systems - Tips for Staying Alive
SA 103
Structural Anatomy™ for the Company Officer:
Surviving Combat Fire Engagement in Residential and Multiple Occupancy Structures
SA 104
Structural Anatomy™:
Floor and Roof Support Systems
SA 105
Structural Anatomy™:
Truss Systems Awareness
SA 106
Structural Anatomy™ for Rapid Intervention Team Commanders
SA 107
Structural Anatomy™:
Fire Behavior and Building Performance
SA 108
Structural Anatomy™ Ordinary Construction - More than Brick and Joist
SA 109
Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Residential Construction
SA 110
Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Pre-WWII Balloon Frame Construction
SA 111
Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Garden Apartment and Townhouses
SA 112
Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Commercial and Retail Structures
SA 113
Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Fire Resistive and Non-Combustible Construction
SA 114
Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction for the Safety Officer
SA 115
LODD and Close Calls: Structural Collapses Operating Experience
SA 116
Structural Reconnaissance for Initial Company Operations
SA 117
Strategic Risk Assessment and Size Up for the Incident Commander
SA 118
Structural Collapse During Fireground Operations -
What You Don’t Know WILL Kill You.
SA 119
Building Construction Risk Assessment for Structural Firefighting Operations
SA 120
Principles of Structural Collapse for Rapid Intervention Teams
SA 121
Fire Behavior and Fire Dynamics for the Command and Company Officer
SA 122
Construction Site Hazards, Operations, and Safety Considerations
 

Taking It to the Streets Series Courses

TS 100

Taking It to the Streets™:
Strategic Risk Management, Safety, and Operational Concerns
for the Command Officer

TS 101

Taking It to the Streets™:
Tactical Risk Management, Safety, and Operational Concerns
for the Company Officer

TS 102

Taking It to the Streets™:
Tactical Assignments, Safety, and Survival for the Firefighter

TS 103

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement in New Residential Fires

TS 104

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement in Balloon Frame Residential Fires

TS 105

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Garden Apartment Fires

TS 106

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Strip Mall Fires

TS 107

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Taxpayer Fires

TS 108

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Warehouse Fires

TS 109

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - “Big Box” Fire Operations

TS 110

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Low and Highrise Fires

TS 111

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Horizontal “Highrise” Offices

TS 112

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Truck Company Roof Operations

TS 113

Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Search and Rescue Operations

 

First-Due Series
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First-Due Series Courses

FD 100
First-Due Command:
Building Construction Factors for Fire Fighter Safety and Survival
FD 101
First-Due Engine Company Operations
FD 102
First-Due Truck Company Operations
FD 103
First-Due Rescue Company Operations
FD 104
First-Due Command Incident Action Planning
FD 105
First-Due Considerations for Mass Casualty Incidents
FD 106
First-Due Considerations for EMS Command
FD 107
First-Due Considerations for the Safety Officer
FD 108
First-Due Considerations for Technical Rescue Incidents
FD 109
First-Due Considerations for Collapse Rescue Incidents
FD 110
First-Due Considerations for Disaster Incidents
FD 111
First-Due Considerations for Potential Terrorism Incidents
FD 112
First-Due Recognition-Primed Decision-Making for Commanders
 

COLTS - Company Officer Leadership Training Symposium
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COLTS™ Series Course

COLTS™ Company Officer Leadership Training Symposium
Command and Company Officer Development
COLTS™ II Command Officer Leadership Training Symposium
 

Incident Command Management Courses
IM 100
Incident Command Management
IM 101
Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) Management
IM 102
Advance Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) Management
IM 103
Hospital Emergency Incident Command Systems (HEICS)
IM 104
Advance Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS) Management
IM 105
Highway Incident Management Systems
IM 106
Redefining Homeland Preparedness for Urban Search and Rescue Operations
IM 107
Incident Command of Technical Rescue Incidents
IM 108
Command and Control of Incident Operations
IM 109
Command and Control of Disaster Response Incidents
IM 110
Command and Control of Large Scale Incidents
IM 111
Developing Effective Incident Action Plans
IM 112
Principles for Effective Command Post Operations
IM 113
Incident Command Operations and Management - The First Thirty Minutes
 

Strategic and Tactical Deployment Courses
ST 100
The Art of Size-Up and Risk Management
ST 101
The Commandments for Combat Structural Fire Engagement - Staying Alive
ST 102
Recognition-Primed Decision-Making for Command Operations
ST 103
Strategies and Tactics for the New Company Officer
ST 104
Principles of Collapse-Rescue Operations for the Company Officer
ST 105
Safety Considerations During Collapse-Rescue Operations
ST 106
Roof Construction and Tactical Truck Company Operations
ST 107
Re-Assessing Tactical Roof Operations:
Lessons for Increasing Fire fighter Survivability
ST 108
Garden Apartment and Townhouse Firefighting Operations:
Command, Operations, and Safety
ST 109
Strategic and Tactical Deployment at “Big Box” Commercial Fires
ST 110
Surviving the Search and Rescue Assignment
ST 111
Vehicle Extrication:
Basic and Advanced Rescue Operations
ST 112
Structural Extrication™ for Rapid Intervention Teams
ST 113
Developing Training Competencies for Structural Collapse Response Capabilities
 

Executive Officer and Command Leadership Courses
EC 101
Defining Incident Command Management for the New Battalion Chief
EC 102
Combat Structural Fire Engagement - Lessons to Live By
EC 103
Command FACTS™ First Arriving Command Training
EC 104
Developing Management Techniques to Lead Volunteer Fire Departments
EC 105
Leadership and Administration for the Volunteer Fire Chief
EC 106
Executive Planning for the Volunteer Fire Chief
EC 107
Leadership and Supervision for the Volunteer Company Officer
EC 108
Developing Effective Communications Techniques
 

Emergency Management Courses
EM 103
Debris Management
EM 104
Multi-Hazard Emergency Planning for Schools and Universities
EM 105
Emergency Public Information for Schools and Universities
EM 108
Mitigation Planning for Local Government
EM 109
Earthquake Safety for Schools and Universities
EM 112
Resource Management
EM 113
Exercising Leadership in an Emergency or Disaster for Public Officials
EM 114
Special Needs Population During a Crisis
 

Corporate, Business, and Facilities Management Courses
CF 100
Integrating National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Management (ICS) into Your Emergency Response Plans
CF 101
National Incident Management System and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Facility Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens
CF 103
Developing Facility Managers and Staff for Incident Command Management
CF 104
Principles of Effective Emergency Management and Preparedness
for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
CF 105
Emergency Preparedness for Facilities
CF 106
Preparing for a Crisis - Development of a Crisis Communications Plan
CF 107
Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment
CF 108
Effective Internal Communication Systems During Crisis Events
CF 109
National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
 

Special Operations Courses
SO 100
Hazardous Materials: An Introduction for Public Officials and Executives
SO 101
Introduction to Hazardous Materials Preparedness
SO 102
Hazardous Materials Contingency Planning
SO 103
Hospital Emergency Department Management of Hazardous Materials Accidents (HMA)
SO 104
Facility Technology for Emergency Responders
SO 105
Developing Training Competencies for Structural Collapse Response Capabilities

Homeland Security, WMD and Terrorism Courses
HT 100
Preparedness and Response for Terrorist Incidents for Senior Officials
HT 101
Emergency Response to Criminal and Terrorist Incidents
HT 102
EMS Operations & Planning for Weapons of Mass Destruction
HT 103
WMD/ Terrorism Incident Operations for Emergency Responders
HT 104
Public Works: Planning For and Responding To a WMD/ Terrorism Incident
HT 105
America's War On Terrorism
HT 106
Bioterrorism Preparedness
HT 107
Computer Forensics: Infoterrorism
HT 108
Domestic Terrorism and Hate Crimes
HT 109
Ecoterrorism: Causes, Impacts, and Preparedness
HT 110
Middle East Orientation and Islamic Cultural Awareness
HT 111
Seaport Security/ Antiterrorism Training
HT 112
Terrorism
HT 113
Terrorism and the Media
HT 114
Agroterrorism
 

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

COMMAND INSTITUTE - Course Descriptions

EMAC International’s courses and training programs meet or exceed nationally recognized industry standards.

NIMS Series
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NS 100 - Integrating the National Incident Management System into Local ICS
The recent adoption of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) has left many agencies, organizations, and municipalities unprepared to address strategic implementation, coordination, and training issues mandated by the federal directive. This program provides participants with a comprehensive overview of the National Response Plan (NRP), National Incident Management System (NIMS), Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-5) - Management of Domestic Incidents, and correlates these to the various incident command systems models presently in use throughout the country.

The program further expands insights into suggested development and implementation models and presents strategic roadmaps for coordinating and integrating NIMS into your local emergency response system. This program can be structured and modified to address specific local and regional emergency management and operational deployment systems, and present insights and options to assist local officials in determination of appropriate implementation models.

This program can also be formatted for use in a Strategic Planning setting, for facilitating dialogue and determining action planning for current or projected NIMS implementation.

NS 101 - National Incident Management System (NIMS) - What Do I Do?
This course will review jurisdictional adoption methodologies and procedures to assist the individual or agency with adopting the NIMS in order to comply with Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)–5, Management of Domestic Incidents. This course is designed to assist the student or agency with jurisdictional compliance and certain aspects of the NIMS, short term and long term.

Specific areas reviewed will include:
Incorporating NIMS into existing training programs and exercises
Incorporating NIMS into Emergency Operations Plans
Promoting intrastate mutual aid agreements
Institutionalize the use of the Incident Command System
Establishing a timeframe and developing a strategy for full NIMS implementation

NS 102 - Developing an Incident Command System (NIMS ICS)
To coordinate the effective use of all of the available resources, agencies need a formalized management structure that lends consistency, fosters efficiency, and provides direction during a response. The ICS organization is built around five major components: Command, Planning, Operations, Logistics and Finance/Administration.

This course will examine the methodology to incorporate a standardized on-scene incident management system specifically to allow responders to adopt an integrated organizational structure equal to the complexity and demands of any single incident or multiple incidents enabling integrated communication and planning by establishing a manageable span of control.

Nine critical components with be review and exercised:
Common Terminology
Modular Organization
Integrated Communication Plan
Unified Command Structure
Consolidate Action Plan
Span of Control
Designated Incident Facilities
Personnel Resources
Resource Management

NS 103 - The National Response Plan (NRP) and National Incident Management System (NIMS)
The National Response Plan, or NRP, specifies how the resources of the Federal Government will work in concert with State, local, and tribal governments and the private sector to respond to Incidents of National Significance. The NRP is predicated on the National Incident Management System, or NIMS. Together the NRP and the NIMS provide a nationwide template for working together to prevent or respond to threats and incidents regardless of cause, size, or complexity.

This course introduces you to the NRP, including the concept of operations upon which the plan is built, roles and responsibilities of the key players, and the organizational structures used to manage these resources. The NRP provides a framework to ensure that all responders work together when our Nation is threatened. The course is designed for Federal department/agency staff responsible for implementing the NRP, as well as State, local and private sector emergency management professionals.

Purpose of the course is to introduce the NRP, so that students can:
Describe the purpose of the NRP
Locate information within the NRP
Describe the roles and responsibilities of entities as specified in the NRP
Identify the organizational structure used for NRP coordination
Describe the field-level organizations and teams activated under the NRP
Identify the incident management activities addressed by the NRP in concert with the NIMS

NS 104 - National Incident Command System (NIMS), I-700
On February 28, 2003, President Bush issued Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5. HSPD-5 directed the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and administer a National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents.

This course introduces NIMS and explains the purpose, principles, key components and benefits of NIMS to include:
Key concepts and principles underlying NIMS.
Benefits of using ICS as the national incident management model.
When it is appropriate to institute an Area Command.
When it is appropriate to institute a Multiagency Coordination System.
The benefits of using a Joint Information System (JIS) for public information.
Ways in which NIMS affects preparedness.
How NIMS affects how resources are managed.
The advantages of common communication and information management systems.
How NIMS influences technology and technology systems.
The purpose of the NIMS Integration Center (NIC)

NS 105 - Introduction to Incident Command System, IS-100
The curriculum addresses the principles and features of an incident command system, how an incident command system is organized, incident facilities and their purposes (including, but not limited to command post, staging area, bases, camps, and heliports-helispots), incident resources such as strike teams, task forces, and single resources, and common responsibilities, such as communications and forms in incident management. We will review and explore other incident management models: NFA/ICS, National Interagency Incident Management System (NIIMS), National Fire Incident Management System Consortium, FIRESCOPE, and U.S. Coast Guard.

NS 106 - Basic Incident Command System, IS-200
This course is designed to identify Incident Command System features and principles, describing in more detail elements such as: establishment and transfer of command, management by objectives, unified command, ICS management functions, organizational flexibility, unity and chain of command, span of control, incident action plans, resource management, common terminology and clear text, integrated communications, and personnel accountability. Incident scenarios are use throughout the course to demonstrate the common responsibilities associated with incident assignments from an Incident Commander and responder perspective.

NS 107 - Intermediate Incident Command System, IS-300
The curriculum addresses duties of various positions within the incident command system. Students will construct an incident management organization for a given incident or event, including appropriate procedures for establishing command, transferring command, and terminating an incident. They will demonstrate knowledge of efficient incident resource management including logistics, finance, administration, and record-keeping. They will demonstrate a familiarity with air operations, and knowledge of incident planning processes.

NS 108 - Law Enforcement Incident Command System (LEICS)
Law Enforcement Incident Command System (LEICS) simplifies the management of critical incidents by organizing the response into modules. Vehicle collisions, pursuits, officer-involved shootings, natural disasters, and civil disturbances represent only a few of the incidents for which an agency can employ LEICS. Under those circumstances involving multiple jurisdictions, LEICS allows agencies to provide a singular response. As a planning tool, LEICS designates in advance the specific duties of all participants. Perhaps more important, it determines who will be in charge at the scene. Whether they require the response of one agency or many, critical incidents become more manageable with LEICS. Anyone in the law enforcement community from the chief, sheriff or to the patrol officer can implement LEICS into its full configuration.

The individual who initiates the ICS response usually assumes command on the scene at the field command post and becomes the incident commander. Unless formally relieved, the incident commander remains in charge and provides a single point of contact. The incident commander oversees the entire operation through divisions, groups or branches, which provide a manageable span of control. All components can be collapsed, expanded, or added as needed during a specific incident. Others may not be needed at all for an emergency limited in scope or duration.

This course is designed to identify elements of the Incident Command System (ICS), as well as the responsibilities of the Incident Commander. Objectives are to define the Incident Command System (ICS); to learn how to identify and take appropriate actions during the stabilization phase of an incident; to learn how to establish a command post and staging area; to describe and apply Division and Group command structure elements; and to describe the purpose and responsibilities of Operations, Planning, Logistics, and Finance/Administration functions within the ICS. All through a series of lectures and table top law enforcement scenarios use to reinforce skills and proficiency.

NS 109 - Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS)
Introduction to ICS, setting up command, and establishing primary functional groups within the command structure. Learning how to use hospital-based ICS worksheet to tracking hospital personnel and resources and coordinated resource response to and from the community. Interactive participation.

NS 110 - NIMS and ICS - Where Do We Go From Here?
Emergency management, fire, rescue, EMS, and law enforcement response agencies and support organizations may be finding themselves challenged in disseminating information related to the national directive of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and how it translates to their local incident command system. This program provides a clear understanding of NIMS and the elements and components that comprise and translate into the various ICS models. This seminar presents NIMS in the context of a comparison between the NFA ICS Model, the Phoenix Fireground Incident Command Model and the Firescope ICM model and how NIMS can assimilate into most ICM/S systems. The program highlights key factors and options for modifying, enhancing or retooling existing incident management systems.

NS 111 - Integrating National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Management (ICS) into Corporate and Facilities Emergency Response Plans
The National Incident Management System (NIMS) establishes parameters for uniformity in the manner in which site specific emergency response operations are conducted and coordinated with the basis on uniformity in organization, terminology and incident management. This program provides insights and guidance on the methodologies to integrate or establish new emergency response plans that are compliant the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the elements of the Incident Command Management systems (ICS). This program identifies the methods, systems and organizational parameters that establish effective and NIMS compliant response plans and utilizes the elements of the Incident Command Management systems (ICS) for site-specific internal operations or when they expand to require off-site municipal resources and agency responses.

NS 112 - National Incident Management System and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Facility Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens
This program provides a comprehensive overview of the National Incident Management System and the manner in which it interfaces with the Incident Command System for incident management. The program focuses on the development and integration of NIMS and ICS into a facility’s emergency response and contingency operations plans and the manner in which designated fire marshals, fire wardens and area safety supervisory staff function in assigned roles and interface with external emergency response agencies and organizations.

NS 113 - National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
This program provides a comprehensive overview of the National Incident Management System and the manner in which it interfaces with the Incident Command System for incident management. The program focuses on the development and integration of NIMS and ICS into a Corporate, Business or Industrial facility’s emergency management, response and contingency operations plans and the manner in which designated fire brigade, security or emergency response and emergency plan staff function in assigned roles and interface with external emergency response agencies and organizations. This program provides the necessary insights, organizational models and methods to upgrade or develop effective facility plans and incident management systems.

NS 114 - NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Emergency Operations Center
This course provides an opportunity for participants to begin developing a NIMS ICS/EOC interface for their community. The course outlines NIMS ICS with Emergency Operations Center (EOC) responsibilities and functions.

NS 115 - NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) - Public Works
This course introduces public works personnel to the NIMS ICS. Several scenarios are included that allow participants to apply NIMS ICS to public works events.

NS 116 - NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) for Public Officials
This course is designed as a briefing of the NIMS Incident Command System (NIMS ICS) for elected and appointed policy level officials. This briefing focuses on providing public officials with an awareness if NIMS ICS as an effective management tool which can be adopted in managing emergency incidents.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com


Structural Anatomy Series

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SA 100 - Structural Anatomy™ for the Command and Company Officer:
Surviving Combat Fire Engagement

A comprehensive presentation of risk-significant occupancies and correlating construction and structural assemblies and systems that directly influence company officer decision-making and risk assessment during combat fireground engagement. Key cue-based indicators and recognition-primed decision making will be discussed, inherent collapse considerations of structural assemblies and systems, structural stability and company officer considerations for tactical deployment for enhancing firefighter survivability.

SA 101 - Structural Anatomy™:
Wood Frame and Ordinary Construction - Fire Operations

Escalating trends in firefighter fatalities and injuries, and the decline in structural fire incidents has impacted the current generation of firefighters who have limited structural firefighting experience. They will gain an understanding of inherent construction features and hazards that directly influence effective risk management and decisive strategic and tactical considerations.

SA 102 - Structural Anatomy™ of Light Weight Roof and Floor Systems - Tips for Staying Alive
The inherent dangers of light-weight roof and floor systems contribute significantly to common causes resulting in firefighter line of duty deaths during combat fire suppression operations. This program examines construction systems, assemblies and elements, inherent collapse features and their integrity considerations during combat fire suppression operations.

SA 103 - Structural Anatomy™ for the Company Officer:
Surviving Combat Fire Engagement in Residential and Multiple Occupancy Structures

Residential structure fires in single and multiple occupancy dwellings are never routine. The inherent dangers in these occupancies, along with strategic and tactical recognition-primed decision-making factors for tactical operations are presented to enhance operations, management and crew integrity. Specific construction features, support and assembly systems, building performance and case studies will be presented.

SA 104 - Structural Anatomy™:
Floor and Roof Support Systems

The structural anatomy of floor and roof systems examines in detail the structural support, assemblies and systems types that comprise roof and floor systems that may be found within various occupancies and structures. Material and assembly performance, construction techniques, structural stability factors, fire exposure and fire dynamics affects will be explored. This program will address system characteristics, risk hazards and operational concerns for all five standard construction classifications.

SA 105 - Structural Anatomy™:
Truss Systems Awareness

The inherent structural characteristics, materials usage, performance and supporting systems for truss construction provides students with a defined understanding of the truss systems and their stability and expected performance under structural fire conditions. A detailed examination of truss systems and their various applications and uses, methods and materials of construction, engineering features and performance under fire conditions will be presented. Case studies will reinforce concepts presented to provide students with a greater degree of understanding and awareness of risk factors for deployment and operations under fireground task assignments.

SA 106 - Structural Anatomy™ for Rapid Intervention Team Commanders
The structural Anatomy for RIT Team Commanders provides a comprehensive overview of strategic engineering features, structural performance, material characteristic and assembly systems. This overview will support a greater sensitivity and a heightened awareness of construction features and occupancy profiles to aid RIT Team commanders with potential deployment and intervention into the various types of structures and occupancies. Structural floor, roof and wall systems are reviewed, significant building features are further explored that will enhance operational deployment for RIT commanders during assessment size-ups, action plan formulation and intervention as emergency operations dictate.

SA 107 - Structural Anatomy™:
Fire Behavior and Building Performance

This program explores the classical concepts of fire behavior and its relationship to building performance during combat structural fire operations. Students will gain a greater degree of understanding of the physics of fire behavior and smoke movement, fire loading, and fire suppression effects. They can better prepare themselves to read and understand smoke conditions, predict with increased assurance the current and projected growth, magnitude and severity of structural fires in built occupancies. They will assimilate those indicators with the recognition-primed decision-making process to develop actions plans for tactical deployment. Regardless of rank or assignment, this program is a prime stepping point in understanding the performance characteristics and anatomy of compartment and structural fires.

SA 108 - Structural Anatomy™ Ordinary Construction - More than Brick and Joist
The anatomy of ordinary construction, typically referred to as brick and joist construction, requires an understanding of significant building features, such as structural supporting systems and load bearing and load transfer elements. This will enable students to gain a greater appreciation of the unique systems that comprise these structures and affect nearly all fire and emergency response organizations through out the world. These structures can be found in rural, suburban and metropolitan locations and pose significant risks to emergency responders who do not recognize and take into account the inherent risk factors that formulate the basis for safe and effective combat structural fire operations. Students will learn to recognize when changes have been made to a structure that have altered its original use and performance. They will learn to identify inherent structural collapse features, age and deterioration, as well as renovations and alternations in occupancy, and use and structural configuration. Instructors will use numerous case studies incorporating operating experiences and the lessons learned from numerous line of duty death incidents to provide the student with the necessary knowledge to conduct effective recognition-primed decision-making and size-up. Students will be able to develop action plans to support strategic and tactical assignments. Ordinary construction and the study of its anatomy, is truly more than just brick and joists.

SA 109 - Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Residential Construction

A detailed examination of residential construction, building materials, methods of construction and technology, inherent structural deficiencies and architectural features that provide the layout and configurations that form the “bread and butter” of most emergency service responses. These structures contribute to a significant number of LODD’s and injuries to firefighters and emergency responders annually. The current generation of residential construction and occupancy usage poses significant hazards and risk to firefighters, company officers and incident commanders. The structural anatomy of residential construction provides the needed edge in awareness, knowledge and principles to engage safely in residential compartment and structural fire incidents.

SA 110 - Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Balloon Frame Construction

The balloon framed structure, predominantly built up thru the early 1950’ s are prevalent throughout the United States in an extensive variety of sizes, configurations and occupancy usage. The unique fire and smoke behavior characteristics that contribute towards rapid fire travel, high risk occupant hazards, exposure and significant fire extension concerns continue to challenge deployments to structural fire incidents. These factors coupled with the building’s structural stability risks and inherent combustibility require a balanced understanding of these construction features, typical floor plan configurations and expected hazards.

SA 111 - Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Garden Apartment and Townhouses
A comprehensive examination of the anatomy of Garden Apartment and Townhouse layouts, construction techniques, features and arrangements. In many areas of the country, garden apartment and townhouses, comprise a significantly higher share of the residential settings. The challenges posed by these multiple occupancies are significant in the areas of rapid fire extension, structural performance, fire affects on occupants and firefighters, and typically are resource intensive under structural fire conditions. The structural anatomy of Garden Apartment and Townhouse construction provides the needed edge in awareness, knowledge and principles to engage safely in Apartment and Townhouse compartment and structural fire incidents.

SA 112 - Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Fire Resistive and Non-Combustible Construction

A focused analysis and examination of Fire Resistive and Non-Combustible Construction through the use of case studies and operating experience. Students will learn the elements of construction, materials, structural systems, performance and integrity factors and features which contribute toward high stakes risk assessment and fluid monitoring of these structures during incident operations. Enhanced insights into material performance, fabrication, assembly and construction provide familiarity in applying these construction and material methods to the occupancies within your jurisdiction.

SA 113 - Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction:
Commercial and Retail Structures

Commercial and retail structure fires are typically not the most common of incident responses, but are the most deadly when operating under structural fire conditions. The scale and layouts of these occupancy types, construction features, fire loading and stability factors create significant risks to all personnel operating at these incidents. These types of fires include many variables such as construction techniques, materials and support systems, coupled with the factors of occupancy, use, arrangement, built-in protection systems, and degree of fire loading, age, alterations and renovations. Commercial and retail structure fires continue to have an adverse impact on most deployed resources within the areas of command, control, resources, suppression capabilities, safety and tactical deployment. This class will provide the needed edge in awareness, knowledge and principles to engage safely in commercial and retail compartment and structural fire incidents.

SA 114 - Structural Anatomy™/ Building Construction for the Safety Officer
The Safety Officer requires an acute and discriminating set of skills and knowledge of building construction to base incident operational decisions and recommendations to the Incident Commander or Command Teams. Responsibilities for the Safety Officer include monitoring and measuring the performance and stability of a given occupancy during combat structural fire engagement or while operating in a non-fire suppression operation within a structure or at a compromised or collapse scene. This program provides crucial insights and examines key operational elements of various building types, occupancies and construction features to enhance or expand the Safety Officer’s recognition-primed assessment and decision-making process to support safe and effective incident operations.

SA 115 - LODD and Close Calls:
Structural Collapse Incidents Operating Experience

The class features a highly dynamic and thought-provoking examination of significant LODD and close call case studies and incident events involving contributing or causal factors resulting from structural collapse operations. An examination of the lessons learned that can limit or preclude similar events will be discussed. Methods for integrating these lessons into operation experiences for enhanced training will be presented.

SA 116 -Structural Reconnaissance for Initial Company Operations
This course features an examination of methods and techniques for cue-based risk assessment and profiling. Students will learn critical reconnaissance techniques to identify inherent and distinctive building construction hazards and challenges that may affect initial company operations. The course will emphasize cue-based risk assessment, size-up profiling, structural reconnaissance techniques, occupancy risk assessment, and structural and construction systems profiling. Students will see how these factors have a direct relationship on initial company structural fire operations, firefighter survivability and the incident management decision-making process. The presentation will identify the methods and techniques to implement effective structural reconnaissance, company safety and integrity, and will provide indicators to enhance the performance of successfully completing fireground assignments for suppression, search, and rescue and tactical support functions.

SA 117 - Strategic Risk Assessment and Size Up for the Incident Commander
What are the key incident indicators that an effective incident command must identify, evaluate and act upon in a timely manner? This program examines key risk assessment and size-up elements that contribute to the strategic decision-making process. Students will gain an understanding of recognition-primed assessment and evaluations and the decision-making process for rapid and accurate problem identification, assessment, prioritization, and subsequent assignment or determination.

SA 118 - Structural Collapse During Fireground Operations - What You Don’t Know WILL Kill You.
Structural fire suppression operations can be challenging tasks unto themselves; however, a compromised or collapse event during combat fire engagement can significantly affect the stability and command management of suppression operations requiring significant changes in the incident action plan. Recognizing subtle or obvious precursors to collapse, inherent construction assembly factors and structural integrity indicators will reduce risk factors and contribute toward safer operations.

SA 119 - Building Construction Risk Assessment for Structural Firefighting Operations
An examination of current trends and methods in building construction. The course will emphasize the return to basics approach to occupancy risk assessment, structural and construction systems, and their direct relationship on structural firefighting operations, firefighter survivability and the incident scene decision-making process. Escalating trends in firefighter fatalities and injuries, and the decline in structural fire incidents has impacted the current generation of firefighters who have limited structural firefighting experience. They will gain an understanding of inherent construction features and hazards that directly influence effective risk management and decisive strategic and tactical considerations. This program examines crucial construction elements and occupancy types and correlates building construction performance toward combat structural fire suppression operations.

SA 120 - Principles of Structural Collapse for Rapid Intervention Teams
The Principles of Structural Collapse for Rapid Intervention Teams (RIT) provides a comprehensive overview of strategic engineering features, collapse profiles, mechanisms, structural collapse performance, material characteristics, and assembly systems. This overview will provide RIT members with a greater sensitivity and awareness of the interdependent collapse elements of construction and occupancy profiles. This will aid them with coordinated deployment and intervention into the various types of compromised structures and occupancies. The course will review inherent structural collapse considerations, collapse phases, operational considerations, floor, roof, and wall systems factors. Other significant building features are further explored that will enhance operational deployment for RIT members during assessment size-ups, action plan formulation, team operations and intervention as emergency operations dictate.

SA 121 - Fire Behavior and Fire Dynamics for the Command and Company Officer
A dynamic program that provides Command and Company Officers with specific emphasis on the classical concepts of fire behavior and its relationship on building performance during combat structural fire operations. The program is designed to focus upon understanding of the physics of fire behavior and smoke movement, fire loading and fire suppression effects from the perspective of the Command or Company Officer. Personnel can better prepare themselves to read and understand smoke conditions, predict with increased assurance the current and projected growth, magnitude and severity of structural fires in built occupancies. They will assimilate those indicators with the recognition-primed decision-making process to develop actions plans for tactical deployment. This program is a prime stepping point in understanding the performance characteristics and anatomy of compartment and structural fires.

SA 122 - Construction Site Hazards, Operations, and Safety Considerations
The significant challenges and safety precautions necessary to operate at construction sites are explored and discussed. This program focuses on hazard recognition and operational safety considerations. The instructor will address a broad-based review of construction sites, phases of construction, hazards and risk identification, strategic and tactical limiting factors, and recognition-primed decision-making. Students will review case studies from real-life construction site incidents. The program addresses command, strategic and tactical considerations for the command, company and firefighter ranks.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

Taking It To the Streets Series
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TS 100 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Strategic Risk Management, Safety, and Operational Concerns for the Command Officer
Strategic Command Officer decision-making during structural fire operations demands a focused and continuing assessment of structural integrity, fire behavior and construction performance to ensure safety and integrity of tactical company missions within the incident action plan. Suppression, ventilation, rescue and support task assignments require tactical executions that take into consideration specific inherent risks associated with various construction and occupancy types.

TS 101 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Tactical Risk Management, Safety, and Operational Concerns for the Company Officer

Tactical Company Officer decision-making during structural fire operations demands a focused and continuing assessment of structural integrity, fire behavior and construction performance to ensure safety and integrity of tactical company missions within the incident action plan. Suppression, ventilation, rescue and support task assignments require tactical executions that take into consideration specific inherent risks associated with various construction and occupancy types.

TS 102 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Tactical Assignments, Safety, and Survival for the Firefighter

A broad-based program that explores and defines the correlation of the characteristic tactical assignments assigned during combat structural fire operations and the impacts they may have on company level and firefighter level safety and survivability. Exploring recent case studies and events, this program identifies safety and survival skills and techniques when you’re in the street ready to do fire combat.

TS 103 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - in New Residential Occupancies

The focus on the newest generation of residential occupancy fires and construction, with street level perspectives on materials, construction and building configurations that have significantly changed the way engine, truck and rescue companies respond, deploy and engage within these large volume, expansive and challenging fires.

TS 104 - Taking It to the Street™:
Combat Structural Engagement - in Balloon Frame Residential Fires

Street tactics for quick and effective decision-making for fire deployment to balloon frame structures. Structures can include single or multiple occupancy residential dwellings, the 2-1/2 story wood frame, Victorian, Queen-Anne, flats, Deckers or Triples, row-frames or row-houses. This program provides insights for effective tactical engagement with the emphasis on company and personnel safety.

TS 105 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Garden Apartment Fires

Tactical decision-making, multiple company coordination and understanding inherent fire travel and building characteristics that influence tactical assignments, resources and time pressures, are the lessons learned and shared on effective techniques for combat fires in Garden Apartment occupancies. The program emphasizes multiple company resource needs and their effective deployment and assignments, action planning and safety.

TS 106 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Strip Mall Fires

Tactical decision-making, multiple company coordination and understanding inherent fire travel and building characteristics that influence tactical assignments, resources and time pressures, are the lessons learned and shared on effective techniques for combat fires in Strip Mall occupancies.

TS 107 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Taxpayer Fires

Tactical decision-making, multiple company coordination and understanding inherent fire travel and building characteristics that influence tactical assignments, resources and time pressures, are the lessons learned and shared on effective techniques for combat fires in Taxpayer occupancies.

TS 108 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Warehouse Fires

Tactical decision-making, multiple company coordination and understanding inherent fire travel and building characteristics that influence tactical assignments, resources and time pressures, are the lessons learned and shared on effective techniques for combat fires in Warehouse occupancies. Special hazards, large area operations, building performance and support protective systems impacts will be presented.

TS 109 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - “Big Box” Fire Operations

The Big-Box Commercial center fires. There are new lessons to be learned from these occupancies which will require insights and awareness of the unique strategic and tactical issues facing company response and operations. These are not your everyday-routine fire response; they require special attention, insights, protocols and company level skills to increase surviving the tactical assignment.

TS 110 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Low and Highrise Fires

Tactical decision-making, multiple company coordination and understanding inherent fire travel and building characteristics that influence tactical assignments, resources and time pressures, are the lessons learned and shared on effective techniques for combat fires in low and high-rise occupancies.

TS 111 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Horizontal “Highrise” Offices

Tactical decision-making, multiple company coordination and understanding inherent fire travel and building characteristics that influence tactical assignments, resources and time pressures, are the lessons learned and shared on effective techniques for combat fires in the newest and emerging large-scale business and corporate office park occupancies. These occupancies expand out horizontally and may be only 3 or 4 stories in height versus the high-rise definition, but have similar challenges and tactical impacts.

TS 112 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Truck Company Roof Operations

Tactical Roof assignments are crucial elements to support combat structural fires. However, the considerations and risks associated with these tactical assignments and the benefits versus risk assessment may not always balance. Understanding the factors for effective and safe truck company roof operations, structural roof risk assessment and monitoring, and the tactical options available provide useful insights into this tactical street assignment.

TS 113 - Taking It to the Streets™:
Combat Structural Engagement - Search and Rescue Operations

Search and Rescue assignments are high-risk, mission critical tactical directives to support combat structural fires. However, the considerations and potential risks to firefighters associated with these tactical assignments, and the benefits versus risk gains may not always balance. Firefighters must understand the survival factors for effective and safe search and rescue operations; occupancy risks; monitoring, advancement and progress of fire involvement; and structural stability. All of these factors will pose challenges and require a solid understanding of fire suppression, construction, occupancy profiles and tactical options. Operating experience, case studies and proven street level insights and experience can make the difference in this tactical street assignment.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

First-Due Series
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FD 100 - First-Due Command: Building Construction Factors for Fire Fighter Safety and Survival
Combat structural fire suppression operations require decisive skills and knowledge in assessing buildings and occupancies. Those responding need a solid understanding of inherent collapse potential, fire behavior and fire spread considerations. They also need command decision-making to assure appropriate strategic incident plans are initiated. This program will examine crucial first-due command risk assessment factors and resource management to increase firefighter survivability under combat structural operations. Participants will learn how to develop mission critical objectives, risk profiles and Incident Action Plans. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 101 - First-Due Engine Company Operations
Participants will explore a wide variety of emergency incident responses involving Engine Company operations. They will assess the incidents using recognition-primed decision-making (RPD), size-up, risk priorities, Incident Action Plan implementation and mission critical assignment functions. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 102 - First-Due Truck Company Operations
Participants will explore a wide variety of emergency incident responses involving Truck Company operations. They will assess the incidents using recognition-primed decision-making (RPD), size-up, risk priorities, Incident Action Plan implementation and mission critical assignment functions. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 103 - First-Due Rescue Company Operations
Participants will explore a wide variety of emergency incident responses involving Rescue Company operations. They will assess the incidents using recognition-primed decision-making (RPD), size-up, risk priorities, Incident Action Plan implementation and mission critical assignment functions. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 104 - First-Due Command Incident Action Planning
Participants will explore a wide variety of emergency incident responses involving the Incident Commander or Incident Command Action Teams. They will assess incidents using recognition-primed decision-making (RPD), size-up, risk priorities, Incident Action Plan implementation and mission critical assignment functions. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 105 - First-Due Considerations for Mass Casualty Incidents
Mass Casualty Incidents call for an in-depth understanding of the development of an Incident Action Plan (IAP). Incident Commanders and Incident Command Action Teams will be presented with a wide variety of Mass Casualty Incident scenarios. They will learn how to develop an IAP taking into consideration emergency operations, size-up, risk priorities and recognition-primed decision-making (RPD) during a mass casualty event. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 106 - First-Due Considerations for EMS Command
This course targets the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Incident Commander and members of the EMS Incident Command Action Team. They will learn mission critical assignment functions specific to EMS incidents. The course will emphasize the development of the Incident Action Plan (IAP). Participants will review elements of an effective IAP by assessing emergency operations, recognition-primed decision-making (RPD), size-up and risk priorities for EMS incidents. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 107 - First-Due Considerations for the Safety Officer
The First-Due Safety Officer has a significant impact and influence on the emergency scene. This course will review the Safety Officer’s duties and functions and how those integrate with the Incident Action Plan (IAP). Participants will be exposed to a variety of emergency incident scenarios. They will evaluate the incidents using emergency operations assessment, recognition-primed decision-making (RPD), size-up and risk priorities. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 108 - First-Due Considerations for Technical Rescue Incidents
This course reviews the procedures for assessing a Technical Rescue Incident. First-Due arrivals must evaluate the safety precautions, technical rescue risk profiles, incident management considerations and resource elements at a Technical Rescue Incident. Participants will practice using recognition-primed decision-making and size-up as they develop and implement an Incident Action Plan (IAP). Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 109 - First-Due Considerations for Collapse Rescue Incidents
This course reviews the assessment procedures that take place during a Collapse Rescue Incident. First-due arrivals must consider safety precautions, phases of collapse, risk profiles, and other tactical factors. Participants will examine critical assignment functions for Emergency Collapse Rescue Operations using recognition-primed decision-making, size-up, and integrated collapse-rescue risk priorities. They will learn how to develop and implement an Incident Action Plan (IAP). Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 110 - First-Due Considerations for Disaster Incidents
The class is designed for the Disaster Incident Commander and Incident Command Action Teams at disaster incidents. They will review a wide variety of emergency disaster incident responses and community level resource deployments. EOC Command operations specific to the EOC/EOF are examined with the emphasis on Incident Action Plan development. Participants will learn how to assess Emergency Disaster Incident Operations using recognition-primed decision-making, size-up and integrated disaster risk priorities. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 111 - First-Due Considerations for Potential Terrorism Incidents
This class uses postulated terrorism incident responses for review by Terrorism Incident Commanders and Incident Command Action Teams. They will learn how to assess the severity and magnitude of a Potential Terrorism Incident and how to coordinate all agencies that respond. They will assess the incident using recognition-primed decision-making (RPD), size-up and integrated multi-agency incident risk priorities. All these factors will be considered as they develop and implement an Incident Action Plan (IAP). Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

FD 112 - First-Due Recognition-Primed Decision-Making for Commanders
This class is designed for the Incident Commander and Incident Command Action teams. They will learn the steps used in Recognition-Primed Decision-Making (RPD). They will practice using RPD to analyze a variety of emergency incident responses. They will also use size-up and risk priorities to develop and implement an Incident Action Plan. Case studies and interactive activities are incorporated within the course. The First-Due series incorporates the most current NIMS command management protocols and organization.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

COLTS - Company Officer Leadership Symposium
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COLTS™ Company Officer Leadership Training Symposium
COLTS™ Company Officer Leadership Training Symposium is an intensive and fast-paced 24 hour course for newly appointed, existing or aspiring company officers. Based upon selective requirements of the NFPA 1021 Fire Officer Standard, the training symposium is designed to expose the student to thought-provoking challenges and stress the profound responsibility that the company officer has within the tactical deployment of emergency response operations. Objectives include increasing company officer effectiveness, promoting leadership and supervisory qualities, increasing tactical operational effectiveness, enhancing initial incident command assumption and action planning, expanding risk assessment awareness, and promoting effective company integrity, management and ultimate crew safety.

Presented by a faculty of highly regarded and experienced fire service officers, commanders and instructors, this training symposium will help chart your path for excellence in company level operations and management. A partial listing of presentation subjects areas include: Building Construction/Structural Anatomy™ Risk Assessment; Command Action Planning for Initial Operations; Motivation and Leadership Techniques; Traits for Effective Supervision, Strategic and Tactical Operations - Ensuring Crew Safety and Integrity; Developing Instructional Excellence; Combat Structural Engagement - Lessons to Keep Your Crew Alive; Conflict Resolution; Company Officer Customer Service Traits; and Leading by Example - How to Make Them Follow.

Command and Company Officer Development
This course is intended to assist fire officers with developing skills for solving diverse problems and situations they will be required to manage effectively in delivering today's ever-changing fire service. The curriculum includes a review of fire department organization and administration, management theory, leadership, communication, motivation, and operations. The course and curriculum is designed to assist the fire officer candidate or existing fire officer to identify the performance requirements necessary to perform the duties of a Company Officer and specifically identifies module levels of progression. The intent is to define performance required at the various levels of officer responsibility to meet the objectives of NFPA 1021 Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications.

A focus on principles of management theory, and its application in the fire service will be facilitated. The course is intended for officers whose area of responsibility encompasses long and short range planning, budgeting and administration. Specific modules include: General Prerequisite Skills; Human Resource Management; Community and Government Relations; Administration, Inspection and Investigation; Emergency Service Delivery; and Safety.

COLTS™ II Command Officer Leadership Training Symposium
A highly dynamic, engaging and energizing program, the Command Officer Leadership Symposium addresses the requirements for leadership developmental for command officers for solving diverse problems and situations they will be required to lead and manage effectively in delivering today's ever-changing fire service. The curriculum includes leadership in a learning organization and concepts and theories on leadership, communication, motivation, and operational effectiveness.

A partial listing of presentation subjects areas include: Motivation and Leadership Techniques; Traits for Effective delegation; Executive planning; Strategic planning; developing personnel and staff Excellence; Customer Service Traits; Human Resource Management; Community and Government Relations; Administration, and Leading by Example - How to Make Them Follow.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

Incident Command Management Courses

IM 100 - Incident Command Management
The class addresses the need for an incident command system, and an understanding of the command skills needed by the departmental supervisor to use the system effectively. It covers guidelines and resource information for setting up and implementing a departmental ICS as well as the National Incident Management System (NIMS) for all first responders. Those include: federal, state, and local governments; fire departments; EMS agencies; law enforcement; public works; educational institutions; health care; business; utilities; and industry.

Mass Casualty Incident Management – General
The mass casualty incident (MCI) management programs are designed for all emergency management disciplines. The programs will introduce and reinforce the fundamental aspects of acute mass injuries, mass care, mass fatalities and mass sickness events that will impact a community's emergency service and health care resources. Course offerings can be modified to meet the needs of law enforcement, fire, EMS, public works, CERT, hospital, and other agencies.

IM 101 - Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) Management
Introduction, awareness and understanding of the dynamic of an MCI. Students will review setting up the first arriving unit functions, triage methods and establishing the medical group function within an ICS process. REACT™ tabletop simulation allows the students to practice decision-making for triage, treatment and transportation at an MCI.

IM 102 - Advance Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) Management
Reinforcement of MCI 101 with advanced ICS management aspects of multiple incident management. Participants will be challenged to determine resource allocation, hospital coordination, and command level activities through use of the REACT™ tabletop simulation. Large scale/special medical incident management activity will be reviewed. This will include establishing and managing multiple medical groups and casualty collection points, and hazardous materials decontamination versus WMD emergency decontamination processes.

IM 103 - Hospital Emergency Incident Command Systems (HEICS)
Introduction to hospital-based ICS, setting up command, and establishing primary functional groups within the command structure. Participants learn how to use hospital-based ICS worksheets to track hospital personnel and resources, and coordinate resource response to and from the community. They also explore taking on new job assignments within the HEICS and the established disaster plan of the agency. A unique role-playing process is used to reinforce the information through interactive participation.

IM 104 - Advance Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS) Management
Reinforcement of the IM 103 HEICS course with an overview of the Federal NIMS ICS. The course demonstrates integrating the hospital into the community’s emergency management plan. Discussion will cover setting up command in the hospital, staffing issues, and understanding the limits on medical care-triage methods. A unique role-playing process enables participants to work out issues using our REACT 3D tabletop format exercise. They will address alternative health care facility concerns and issues, managing multiple events, resource allocation, external hospital coordination, and command post operations. Exercises for internal and external events can be evaluated and tested by design.

IM 105 - Highway Incident Management Systems
This program uses the new Highway IMS Model Procedure Guide with an interactive 3D tabletop exercise to introduce and reinforce the extreme danger that emergency responders are exposed to on highway incidents. This program supports the new FEMA Highway Safety Program and the MUTCD Federal Standards of 2003. At the completion of this program participants will have a better understanding of the new federal rules regarding highway lane closures, road blockage, warnings, and lessons learned that will save responders lives.

IM 106 - Redefining Homeland Preparedness for Urban Search and Rescue Operations
Following the events of September 11th, 2001, a redefined approach toward homeland preparedness became necessary. There are new challenges and demands for increased levels of strategic services, particularly enhanced capabilities for technical rescue, urban search and rescue operations, and collapse rescue operations. This program will address these new challenges by presenting an overview of the following updated strategic services including: Technical Rescue; Special OPS and US&R team planning considerations; community risk assessment planning; team organizational structure; training requirements and strategic and tactical considerations. The NFPA 1670 Standard on Operations and Training for Technical Rescue Incidents will be discussed as well as a prototype ten-step planning process.

IM 107 - Incident Command of Technical Rescue Incidents
This program addresses the specific incident management requirements for conducting safe and effective technical rescue incidents. The program will focus on the expansion of the basic initial company response and escalation models for integrated incident command management and control. Presentation of specific ICS functional areas, sections, branch, division/groups and unit requirements, integrated resource considerations, safety considerations for the incident commander, sector officers and safety officers will be presented. The program will focus on typical ICS models for structural collapse-rescue operations, trench rescue and confined space rescue incident response operations and scene management protocols.

IM 108 - Command and Control of Incident Operations
The course is designed to cover basic factors involved in coping with an emergency scene, and determining the best use of available resources in protecting lives and property. The course emphasizes the changing nature of an emergency situation, and the ways in which the fire officer can evaluate the effectiveness of his or her proposed Incident Action Plan. This course will outline simple techniques of size-up, risk management, strategic determination, tactical considerations and resource deployment. Specific emphasis is placed on incident management using the Incident Command System. Students will learn through repetitive reinforcement skill sessions on a tabletop simulation board and actually perform the assigned duty. The course is intended for officers who may be in command of fires and other emergencies involving close coordination and maximum use of large amounts of staffing and equipment. Typical tactical situations and case histories are given. The development of critical thinking skills is stressed. All material and subject matter meets or exceeds the objectives of NFPA 1500, Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Programs; NFPA 1561, Standards for Emergency Services Incident Management System and ISO.

IM 109 - Command and Control of Disaster Response Incidents
A consolidated program that examines and presents management tools, protocols and system methodologies to effectively command and control disaster incidents. Building upon the initial deployment of resources, it takes the initial action plan and organizational structure and provides insights into expanding the incident for area command and unified command operations and management. The programs address effectiveness of command and incident management, multiple agency coordination, integrating the NIMS deployment and command system, Emergency Operations Center interface and coordination, logistics, and planning and development of Incident Action Plans for effective incident prioritization, deployment and operations.

IM 110 - Command and Control of Large Scale Incidents
Escalating incidents that increase in severity or magnitude can quickly overwhelm and challenge the Incident Command Team. The command and control of large incidents demonstrates the need for expanding resources and may require the implementation of operations into the Incident Command Management organization. Planning and logistics of large scale incidents requires effective communications, delegation and oversight by assigned personnel. Such incidents also increase demands on strategic decision-making and tactical deployment. This program will provide an overview of operational perspectives for large scale incident events and will use case studies, exercises and group activities to reinforce concepts and develop command insights. This program can also be offered as short version presentations and presented in conjunction with REACT tabletop command simulator boards to bridge classroom concepts with hands-on simulation training opportunities for skill development.

IM 111 - Developing Effective Incident Action Plans
Developing effective and organized Incident Action Plans is crucial to the strategic and tactical goals of all managed incidents. A weakness in the IAP will translate into ineffective incident operations and may jeopardize the safety of personnel and the successful mitigation of the incident. This course focuses on developing, documenting and communicating effective Incident Action Plans through case studies, individual and group exercises and classroom simulations. The program can be delivered in the ICS format or by integrating the new NIMS content.

IM 112 - Principles for Effective Command Post Operations
Establishing, organizing and implementing an effective Command Post is seldom a training topic until now. This program presents and reinforces the principles and phases of establishing an effective Command Post that can expand and escalate as the complexity and magnitude of the incident grows. This program will provide the necessary insights, phases, considerations, methods and tools necessary to initiate an effective and efficient command post at your next incident or alarm.

IM 113 - Incident Command Operations and Management - The First Thirty Minutes
What are the real priorities and phases of effective Incident Command Operations in the first thirty minutes of an incident? Are you focusing in on the appropriate areas? How are you processing information and communications? How are you developing decisions that will be translated into Incident Action Plans? Are the first thirty minutes typically a blur, or are they recognized for their stability, efficiency, decisive, rational and reassuring approach to the incident? This program will provide you with the necessary tools, knowledge and insights to enhance your incident command operations in the first thirty minutes and well beyond.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

Strategic and Tactical Deployment Courses

ST 100 - The Art of Size-Up and Risk Management
Effective incident size-up and the identification, determination and processing of incident indicators can be a challenging task. A delicate balance of experience, training, skills, intuition and the ability to recognize both the significant and seemingly insignificant indicators at an incident can mean the difference in whether the incident is mitigated or escalates. The Art of Size-Up and Risk Management provides insights, proven methods built upon years of street level experience and elements of recognition-primed decision-making to enhance skills in size-up, risk assessment and incident management. Case studies, group exercises and simulations reinforce course concepts for skill development. This program can be custom designed around specific risks, hazards and past incidents in your own jurisdiction. This program can also be integrated as a consolidation presentation in conjunction with REACT tabletop command simulator boards to bridge classroom concepts with hands-on simulation training opportunities for skill development.

ST 101 - The Commandments for Combat Structural Fire Engagement - Staying Alive
A thought-provoking and insightful program that assesses and explores the manner in which interior fire suppression operations have evolved. It looks at the changes that are pushing the envelope in current day practices as well as altering our strategic, tactical and task level operations for Combat Structural Fire Engagement. Program elements address the following: risk/benefit; phases of effective combat engagement; the commandments of decisive and effective structural fire engagement; the new rules of the game-staying alive; and recalibrating and redefining the new generation of firefighters, company officers and commanders.

ST 102 - Recognition-Primed Decision-Making for Command Operations
Decisive command and company officer decision-making requires rapid, timely and accurate risk assessment, option evaluation and strategic incident action plan implementation. With the declining trend in structural fires in various occupancies, incident commanders may lack the necessary experience to make appropriate fireground decisions during combat engagement. Recognition-Primed Decision-Making is an emerging command concept adopted from the current military training applications, which enhance the command decision-making process.

ST 103 - Strategies and Tactics for the New Company Officer
With the continuing decline nationally in structural fire incidents and the necessity for new company officers to have the essential tools and insights into effective strategies and tactics, this course presents.

ST 104 - Principles of Collapse-Rescue Operations for the Company Officer
The inherent dangers and risk potential during initial company deployment and operations at incidents involving structural collapse rescue requires a firm understanding of collapse mechanics principles, construction and materials performance factors, inherent hazard recognition and personnel survivability considerations during initial and extended operations. This program addresses initial company response considerations, deployment considerations and hazards awareness with an emphasis on personnel safety and survivability and company-level incident command awareness for the demands associated with collapse- rescue operational assignments.

ST 105 - Safety Considerations During Collapse-Rescue Operations
The inherent dangers and risk potential during operations at incidents involving structural collapse rescue require a firm understanding of collapse mechanics principles, construction and materials performance factors, inherent hazard recognition and personnel survivability considerations during initial and extended operations. This program addresses initial company response considerations, deployment considerations and hazards awareness with an emphasis on.

ST 106 - Roof Construction and Tactical Truck Company Operations
This course is designed to identify Incident Command System features and principles, describing in more detail elements such as: establishment and transfer of command, management by objectives, unified command, ICS management functions, organizational flexibility, unity and chain of command, span of control, incident action plans, resource management, common terminology and clear text, integrated communications, and personnel accountability. Incident scenarios are use throughout the course to demonstrate the common responsibilities associated with incident assignments from an Incident Commander and responder perspective. Prerequisite: I-100, Introduction to the Incident Command System.

ST 107 - Re-Assessing Tactical Roof Operations: Lessons for Increasing Fire fighter Survivability
What has the fire services learned in the past twenty years as it relates to tactical roof operations and the effects of structural integrity, tactical roof assignments and the needs for strategic ventilation support. How can we increase firefighter survivability, properly address risk assessment factors and learn from previous fatal incidents the lessons for effective deployment and assignment of personnel for conducting roof operations. Construction, age, strategic and tactical decisions and material performance all have common threads in case studies such as the Walbaum’s Fire; Hackensack, NJ; Chesapeake, VA; Lake Worth, TX. This presentation will pose the questions of what has the fire service learned and forgotten over the period in which newer generations of firefighters and fire officers have now assumed command of the fireground and what can you do to increase fire firefighter survivability during roof operations.

ST 108 - Garden Apartment and Townhouse Firefighting Operations:
Command, Operations, and Safety
A comprehensive look at the strategic and tactical operational factors that influence and contribute towards incident management and mitigation at Garden Apartment and Townhouse fires. These multiple occupancy structures pose significant risks and have inherent challenges that affect firefighter survival, occupant safety, company effectiveness and incident command effectiveness. Objectives include a review of construction features, fire command management principles, strategies and tactics for multiple company operations and company coordination, with the focal point on firefighter safety during deployment missions. Command, NIMS/ICS principles, Engine Co., Truck Co. and Rescue Co. OPS, incident action planning (IAP), Safety Officer considerations, strategic & tactical options- what goes right/ what can go wrong; EMS, Support companies and multiple alarm coordination are reviewed with use of case studies to support program presentations and content.

ST 109 - Strategic and Tactical Deployment at “Big Box” Commercial Fires
Strategies and Tactics at the “Big Box” commercial Building fire required perceptive, decisive and critical incident command management with a disciplined conservative approach towards tactical deployments. The infrequent occurrences and magnitude of these incidents requires insights and skill development for enhanced preparedness and application of recognition prime decision making (RPDM) based upon the size, complexity and suppression strength required to engage and mitigate these types of firefighting activities. Significant case studies, anticipated structural performance, fire loading and commodity hazards coupled with the unique requirements for air management, RIT resource allocation and implementation of special strategies and tactics are reviewed and disseminated in throughout this course.

ST 110 - Surviving the Search and Rescue Assignment
What are the skills, insights, knowledge and training required of personnel assigned to conduct search and rescue assignments under combat structural fire conditions in order to survive the mission? This course presents crucial key elements associated to the search and rescue mission and explores the knowledge and skills essential to personnel, teams and companies assigned search and rescue tasks in various occupancy types and under varying combat fire conditions.

ST 111 - Vehicle Extrication:
Basic and Advanced Rescue Operations
A compilation of basic and advance concepts that provide strategic and tactical approaches towards fulfilling the assignment for vehicle extrication & rescue. Focusing upon the command officer and company officer’s roles and responsibilities during these incidents, this course will enable the student to develop appropriate incident action plans, determine concurrent priorities, identify and integrate resource needs and manage and mitigate the incident under an effective NIMS/ICS system.

ST 112 - Structural Extrication™ for Rapid Intervention Teams
RIT Teams require conscientious insights into an given structure and occupancy in order to access, enter and successfully extricate a downed firefighter. The ability and skill sets that are essential for this mission are contingent upon a concise understanding of how to extricate and remove structural components, building assemblies and materials and the capability to move throughout the structure vertically and horizontally based upon construction and floor plans. This program presents revealing fundamentals for effective and timely RIT deployments and how to perform Structural Extrication™ in a given environment. This program is an EMAC exclusive within the Command Institute and provides groundbreaking theories, practices and applications.

ST 113 - Developing Training Competencies for Structural Collapse Response Capabilities
An essential program that addresses the training requirements of the NFPA 1670 standard on Operations and Training for Technical Rescue Incidents with a focus on structural collapse response and incident operations. This course will provide the roadmap for identifying, developing and implanting effective training programs for collapse incident operations, coordination with specialized response teams and recognizing skill sets necessary for safe incident deployments.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

Executive Officer and Command Leadership Courses

EC 101 - Defining Incident Command Management for the New Battalion Chief
The transition from company officer to a command position, responsible for initial and ongoing command and action planning functions many times doesn’t come with operating instructions for these responsibilities. This program bridges that gap and addressed through a sequential look at the command function, responsibilities, expectations for effective risk and safety management, the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and ICS integration and provides a forum for dialog and the exchange of mutual challenges facing the newly appointed or elected commanding officer. This dynamic and highly interactive course will focus and revitalize your perspectives, provide a path for success and balance the tactical perspectives of your previous responsibilities to those at the strategic risk management level.

EC 102 - Combat Structural Fire Engagement - Lessons to Live By
A though provoking and insightful program that examines case studies, line of duty deaths, operating experiences, close calls and near misses and other significant incident and operational events specific to Combat Structural Fire Engagement. Providing a forum for dialog and stimulating critical feedback from the participants, this program strives to identify the lessons learned from these significant events and through the shared insights of the class correlate these to the lessons to live and survive by.

EC 103 - Command FACTS™ First Arriving Command Training
First arriving; these word have significant meaning when placed into the context of emergency management and response. Effective incident management is contingent upon a clear understanding of the actual or projected severity, magnitude and growth potential of a given incident. Command FACTS™ examines the process and steps needed to perform at the highest level when first arriving at an incident and assuming the command. What are the priorities?, what does an IAP provide me? What options do I have for command and why should I take command and control? A highly interactive program, this course can be integrated with our Command Institute, REACT™ Table Top Simulator programs to provide both a focused classroom session and transition to hands-on table top simulation to reinforce classroom concepts.

EC 104 - Developing Management Techniques to Lead Volunteer Fire Departments
The ability to lead an organization is built upon established and defined management principles that help drive and maintain cohesiveness within an organization. This program explores and provides useful examples of classical management principles and effective case study programs through which volunteer fire service organizations have established themselves as leaders in the management and operations of their respective organizations.

EC 105 - Leadership and Administration for the Volunteer Fire Chief
This intensive course of instruction identifies and provides the appropriate skills for the volunteer emergency services officer to become familiar with administrative effectiveness through adaptive leadership skills and efficient management practices. Course objectives and focus includes leadership, establishing the platform, planning, creating strategic partnerships, human resource management, problem solving, recruitment and retention, organizational needs assessment and assets, risk assessment, leading change management and methods to implement effective decision-making, behaviors within your given organization.

EC 106 - Executive Planning for the Volunteer Fire Chief
This course of instruction in Executive Planning principles, concepts and execution, prepares volunteer fire service managers to implement the appropriate tools to evaluate options and make sound and viable decisions that create the desired future. The course of instruction provides the ability to transition to an active learning organization and environment within your department or agency. Areas of instruction include leadership, management insights, strategic planning, analysis, acquisition, and implementation strategies and success paths.

EC 107 - Leadership and Supervision for the Volunteer Company Officer
Effective supervisory oversight and engagement for the company officer is crucial to the success and longevity of any organization. The first-line supervisor, consisting of the company officer provides the daily interface between the line firefighter and the command and executive officers. Learn what are the traits, behaviors and methods for achieving effective operations. Leadership and Supervision looks at the issues affecting today’s fire service delivery system and give you hard and fast information to address common immediate concerns.

EC 108 - Developing Effective Communications Techniques
In this information superhighway of high speed and immediate communications systems, hardware and devices; the need to stop and recalibrate ourselves back to the art of effective communications. This course presents classical principles of communications and how to effectively implement them in your work environment and how to expand them into both business environment and emergency management settings.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

Emergency Management Courses

EM 103 - Debris Management
This course will provide an overview of issues and recommended actions necessary to plan for, respond to, and recover from a major debris-generating event with emphasis on state, tribal, and local responsibilities. The course includes debris staff organizations, compliance with laws and regulations, contracting procedures, debris management site selection, volume reduction methods, recycling, special debris situations, and supplementary assistance.

EM 104 - Multi-Hazard Emergency Planning for Schools and Universities
This course will provide participants with the knowledge, skills, and tools they need to develop effective Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs) for school and university emergencies. Coordination with local emergency responders and local emergency response plans will be emphasized.

Participants will be able to:
Recognize that emergency planning for schools and universities is community-based and evolving.
Identify the people and agencies who should be involved in their planning process.
Identify the types of hazards that present the highest risk for schools and universities.
Describe the potential damage that risks and hazards cause.
Identify structural and nonstructural hazards in and around the educational facility.
Mitigate nonstructural hazards and develop a mitigation strategy for structural hazards.
Develop and implement a strategy for testing the plan.
Revise the EOP based on lessons learned from exercises and/or actual emergencies.

EM 105 - Emergency Public Information for Schools and Universities
This course emphasizes basic skills and knowledge needed for emergency public information activities for schools and universities. Topics include the role of the Public Information Officer (PIO) in crisis situations, new release writing, and television/radio interview skills.

EM 107 - Disaster-Resistant Economy and Jobs
This course highlights the need for the local business community to mitigate and prepare for disasters. Communities must protect their economic base in order to survive and thrive in the wake of a disaster. This course will help local leaders recognize the impact of disasters on business and industry an what steps need to be taken to lessen the impact of disaster on local jobs.

EM 108 - Mitigation Planning for Local Government
This course discusses federal guidance which requires local governments to prepare and adopt jurisdiction-wide hazard mitigation plans as a condition of receiving Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds to "brick and mortar" mitigation projects.

EM 109 - Earthquake Safety for Schools and Universities
This course is will help schools and universities prepare to be self-sufficient in the aftermath of a damaging earthquake. Topics include planning, hazard identification and nonstructural mitigation techniques, drills, immediate response exercises, post-earthquake recovery and mitigation opportunities, and crisis intervention.

EM 112 - Resource Management
This course provides participants with the knowledge and skills to effectively identify, develop, and manage a resource management system during an emergency incident. The course covers aspects of how to tap into little used resources, how to develop and manage a system to better organize scarce public and private sector resources in a crisis situation, and how to ask for help.

EM 113 - Leadership in an Emergency or Disaster for Public Officials
This course is designed to prepare senior, elected or appointed officials to lead and direct their jurisdiction during an emergency or disaster. Course participants will better understand their roles and responsibilities during a crisis event; maximize gains for disaster recovery assistance through appropriate contacts and knowledge of available resources; and understand the partnership among federal, state, and local resources.

EM 114 - Special Needs Population During a Crisis
This course will outline issues and challenges in identifying and meeting the general needs of disabled populations within a community during a crisis. Challenges unique to this population will be highlighted, as well as specific intervention and mitigation strategies.

EM 115 - Managing Public Transportation Emergencies
This course will address the existing regulations, procedures for developing and implementing policies, and a review of lessons learned from recent emergency transportation emergencies. After course completions, participants will be able to conduct a Vulnerability Self Assessment of the mass transit infrastructure, determine safety versus security challenges of closing a public transit system, and identify critical emergency response actions and ensure system-wide compliance.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

Corporate, Business, and Facilities Management Courses

CF 100 - Integrating National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command Management (ICS) into Your Emergency Response Plans
This course delivers fundamental concepts by integration of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) using your Emergency Response Plan. This is designed to effectively give your staff the ability to understand the working relationships of your own Emergency Response Plan following the NIMS model. When its time for Federal assistance after a major event, you will be ready to REACT!

CF 101 - National Incident Management System and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Facility Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens
This program provides a comprehensive overview of the National Incident Management System and the manner in which it interfaces with the Incident Command System for incident management. The program focuses on the development and integration of NIMS and ICS into a facility’s emergency response and contingency operations plans and the manner in which designated fire marshals, fire wardens and area safety supervisory staff function in assigned roles and interface with external emergency response agencies and organizations.

CF 103 - Developing Facility Managers and Staff for Incident Command Management
This course prepares the facility managers and staff creating foundation with basic skills of terminology and knowledge of how the incident command system can effectively determine the outcome should disaster strike disrupting your business. We will analyze operational issues and how management communicates with staff using an Incident Management system. The importance of documentation will be addressed during and after the response of an emergency situation.

CF 104 - Principles of Effective Emergency Management and Preparedness for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
This course takes the basic principals Government uses following the National Standards during an emergency event and applies them to the Private Sector. We give you the necessary tools to effectively manage the event so you’re prepared when it’s time for Federal assistance. This position your company’s so procedures are in place, all equipment and personnel needs are addressed so a response to an emergency situation may be instinctive and appropriate. This course will take the private sector to the next level.

CF 105 - Emergency Preparedness in Facilities
This course provides facility staff and administrators with the strategic resources to prepare for, and recover from, any emergency or disaster. Focusing on the creation or improvement of an organization-wide emergency management plan, we ensure all procedures are in place, all equipment and personnel needs are addressed so a response to an emergency situation may be instinctive and appropriate. Topics include; How to create/improve your emergency management plan; "What emergency response should I expect?"; How to train staff to react to an emergency situation; How to develop an emergency communication plan; "What regulatory issues do I face?"; How to improve conditions at your facility to mitigate damage, acts of violence, and terrorism.

CF 106- Preparing for a Crisis - Development of a Crisis Communications Plan
This course provides participants the an overview and developmental steps to creating an effective Crisis Communications Plan. This intensive workshop includes detailed discussions of how to conduct a comprehensive vulnerability audit, analyze and report results, technical writing of the plan, training, and plan testing and validation.

CF 107 - Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment
This course will provide a starting point for conducting a comprehensive risk assessment. After completion, workshop participants will know what constitutes a comprehensive Risk Assessment, what special knowledge is required to conduct a Risk Assessment, Risk Assessment formats, and how to analyze and report results.

CF 108 - Effective Internal Communication Systems During Crisis Events
Regardless of an organization's size, reputation or industry, preparing for effective employee communication in times of crisis inevitably calls for placing the proper organizational structure and processes in place before the crisis occurs. This course prepares participants to assign responsibilities, train employees and establish instruments that enable seamless vertical and horizontal communication.

CF 109- National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command (NIMS/ICS) for Corporate, Business, and Industrial Facilities
This program provides a comprehensive overview of the National Incident Management System and the manner in which it interfaces with the Incident Command System for incident management. The program focuses on the development and integration of NIMS and ICS into a Corporate, Business or Industrial facility’s emergency management, response and contingency operations plans and the manner in which designated fire brigade, security or emergency response and emergency plan staff function in assigned roles and interface with external emergency response agencies and organizations. This program provides the necessary insights, organizational models and methods to upgrade or develop effective facility plans and incident management systems.

To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

Special Operations Courses

SO 100 - Hazardous Materials: An Introduction for Public Officials and Executives
This course is designed for key public officials, department heads, and private executives with a need to understand basic policy issues regarding hazardous materials threats to their community. Focusing on hazard assessment, risk management, planning, and response considerations, the course provides officials with a basic overview of hazardous materials issues.

SO 101 - Introduction to Hazardous Materials Preparedness
This course provides an introduction to hazardous materials concepts and practices. The course covers basic principles of preparedness, the role of local communities, and the hazards presented by chemicals in transportation or fixed-site threats.

SO 102 - Hazardous Materials Contingency Planning
This course provides in introduction to hazardous materials contingency planning. The course covers emergencies including transportation, use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and episodic releases of air-toxic chemicals from fixed-site faculties. Emphasis is placed on interagency cooperation and the identification of technical assistance. Topics include local, state, and federal mechanisms to assist in planning and response, tactical requirements, hazardous materials characteristics, and regulatory compliance.

SO 103 - Hospital Emergency Department Management of Hazardous Materials Accidents (HMA)
This course introduces medical personnel to procedures for handling hazardous materials accident victims in the hospital environment. The course will enable participants to provide prompt and appropriate care for hazardous materials accident victims while minimizing exposure and preventing the spread of contamination.

SO 104 - Facility Technology for Emergency Responders
This course will provide emergency responders with an overview of technology facing them as they respond to an emergency situation at a commercial, educational, or retail facility. Emphasis is placed on architectural systems including interior design elements and layout, floor and ceiling systems, and hardware systems; finish materials; lighting and electrical systems; heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; domestic and waste water systems; and, control systems including facility automation systems, fire and evacuation systems, communication systems, and intruder/burglar alarm and security systems.

SO 105 - Developing Training Competencies for Structural Collapse Response Capabilities
This presentation will address the specific training and operational requirements of the NFPA 1670 standard on Operations and Training for Technical Rescue Incidents with specific focus on the Structural Collapse Response preparedness. Training requirements for the three tiered response capabilities will be discussed, integrations models for department-wide training program implementation, incident management training requirements for company and command officers and integrating awareness, operational and technical level skills and competencies.

 

 
To schedule or inquire about a course, please contact us.
1-800-963-EMAC (3622)info@emacintl.com

 

Homeland Security and Terrorism Courses

HT 100 - Preparedness and Response for Terrorist Incidents for Senior Officials
This course focuses on the roles and responsibilities of community senior, elected and appointed policy level officials in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from terrorist attacks.

HT 101 - Emergency Response to Criminal and Terrorist Incidents
This course introduces emergency responders to crime scene safety by describing hazards that may exist. The course exposes participants to evidence preservation and fosters cooperation among all responders through role and responsibility clarification.

HT 102 - EMS Operations and Planning for Weapons of Mass Destruction
This course trains emergency medical service personnel to properly perform patient triage, transport, and treatment in the event of exposure to biological, nuclear (radiological), incendiary, chemical, and explosive weapons. Upon course completion, participants will demonstrate the skills necessary for proper detection and monitoring, triage, mass decontamination, treatment and stabilization, self protection, and cross contamination prevention.

HT 103 - WMD/ Terrorism Incident Operations for Emergency Responders
This course focuses on the unique personnel protection challenges that responders face during a weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or terrorist incident. Upon course completion, participants will be able to respond to a WMD/terrorism incident in a defensive mode and preclude the spread of a WMD hazard to the public and the environment. Major topics include; assessing WMD hazards, predicting the likely behavior of WMD materials, effectively operating and communicating in a unified command structure of NIMS ICS, determining detection equipment and personal protection equipment (PPE) needs, performing emergency decontamination, and identifying defensive strategies for a WMD incident.

HT 104 - Public Works: Planning For and Responding To a WMD/ Terrorism Incident
This course focuses on enhancing the capabilities of public works leadership, in coordination with state and local emergency response personnel, to plan for, respond to, and manage a weapons of mass destruction (WMD) terrorism incident. The course presents the fundamental skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will be needed by public works managers and supervisors when they are called upon to respond to a WMD terrorism incident or develop a plan to prevent or mitigate a WMD terrorism incident, including chemical and biological agents, nuclear/radiological weapons and explosive devices.

HT 105 - America's War On Terrorism
This course examines the ongoing challenges to US national security posed by the threat of international and domestic terrorism. Participants will understand the causes of the rise of the global terrorist threat, the motives and methods of the terrorists, and the ways in which the United States is waging war to prevent future attacks and safeguard the homeland.

HT 106 - Bioterrorism Preparedness
This course provides an introduction to public health emergency preparedness and response, with an emphasis on bioterrorism-related threats and events. Participants will understand learn how to defeat the various institutional and professional obstacles to cooperation and strategies facing public and private organizations during a bioterrorism event.

HT 107 - Computer Forensics: Infoterrorism
This course will study the nature of information warfare, including computer crime and information terrorism, in the global information infrastructure. Participants will gain an understanding of the threats and vulnerabilities, including economic espionage, denial of service, destruction and modification of data, distortion and fabrication of information, forgery, control and disruption of information flow, and perception management. Countermeasures will be covered including authentication, encryption, auditing, monitoring, and firewalls, and the limitations of those countermeasures. Participants will be exposed to cyberspace law, law enforcement actions, and threats to financial and safety critical systems.

HT 108 - Domestic Terrorism and Hate Crimes
This course examines the issue of bigotry and hate crime and how it manifests itself into criminal behavior. Various groups who have been labeled as supporting or engaging in domestic terrorism will be studied.

HT 109 - Ecoterrorism: Causes, Impacts, and Preparedness
This course will explore how lawful protest and political action turn into Ecoterrorism. The issue of "What are the differences between free speech, lawful protest, civil disobedience, and terrorism?" will be examined. Discussion will include what organizations are thought to have conducted Ecoterrorism, what infrastructure systems are vulnerable, what steps can be taken to mitigate or prevent Ecoterrorism, and what are the lessons learned.

HT 110 - Middle East Orientation and Islamic Cultural Awareness
This course will provide historical, cultural, religious social, political and military information on Middle East. Additionally, this course offers an opportunity for participants to learn about the cultural heritage of Islam. This program will focus on the history, culture, heritage, and society of the Islamic world, providing an opportunity to discuss and analyze the various viewpoints that emanate from the Islamic world-view. Students will develop an informed understanding of the Islamic religion, heritage and culture, and its impact on the contemporary experience of Muslims in world.

HT 111 - Seaport Security/ Antiterrorism Training
This course provides instruction in the areas of threat awareness and tactics, dynamics of terrorism, seaport and maritime operations, port surveys and inspections, hazardous materials, bombs and explosives, patrol methods, crisis management and emergency planning.

HT 112 - Terrorism
This introductory course will survey international and domestic terrorism. The origins, preconditions, dynamics, and structure of terrorist activities and the sponsor organizations will be examined. Key case studies will be explored, including the al Queda attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. This course examines the issues of terrorism as they relate to the planners and responders at the local level. Concepts of planning for a terrorist incident are presented with emphasis on integrating emergency operations plans. The course will also discuss preparations and guidelines for terrorist attacks focusing on planning problems, countermeasures, response actions and the roles of local, state, and federal government agencies.

HT 113 - Terrorism and the Media
This course examines how the mass media, the public, and the decision makers in the United States respond to major acts of terrorism. Participants will explore links suggesting that terrorists try to exploit interactions between the news media, public opinion, and decision making.

HT 114 - Agroterrorism
This course examines the deliberate introduction of an animal or plant disease with the goal of generating fear, causing economic distress, and/or undermining social stability. Participants will be exposed to Agroterrorism through history, introduction pathways, mitigation and preparedness strategies, cross contamination issues, and containment practices.

 

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